Reports and accountability | Mount Allison

Financial reports

Reports from previous years not included below are available from Financial Services. Contact Atif Butt at abutt@mta.ca or 506-364-2443.

Annual Financial Reports

Prior to 2019, the information in the Annual Financial Report was compiled in two separate documents:

Budget
Endowment Fund holdings

Note on the annual investment holdings report

Mount Allison University invests its endowment fund in a variety of asset classes (types of investments). It invests in pooled investment vehicles which provide the University with a more cost effective way to achieve diversification.

This means that the University does not invest directly in individual company stocks (equities) or bonds (fixed income), rather it uses investment managers to invest in pooled funds which in turn invest the University's funds, along with many other investors' funds, in individual stocks and bonds or other pooled funds.

Mount Allison selects and continuously monitors third-party investment managers with the assistance of an external investment consultant.

The annual investment holdings report discloses the underlying equity and fixed income holdings in its endowment fund. The market values reported in the report represent the value of the proportion of the stock or bond as if it was owned directly by the University.

Please direct any questions concerning these reports to the University's director of finance-controller, Guylaine Roy, at groy@mta.ca.

Compensation and expense reports
Federal Research Support Fund

Performance objectives

Report on performance objectives

About the Research Support Fund

The Research Support Fund is an investment by Canadian taxpayers to support some of the indirect costs of research.

Formerly known as the Indirect Costs Program (established in 2003), these funds reinforce the research investment made by the federal government in the ares of health sciences, engineering, natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities through its three research granting agencies, CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC.

Indirect costs of research

Research funding provided through the granting agencies (CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC) is generally limited to direct project costs (e.g., research equipment, research assistant salaries, etc.).

Institutions such as Mount Allison University whose researchers receive funding for research also incur costs to manage their research enterprise. These are often called "indirect costs of research." These costs include, for example, the costs of maintaining modern labs and equipment; costs of providing researchers with access to up-to-date knowledge resources; costs of managing and administering research; costs of meeting regulatory and ethical requirements; and costs of transferring research results to knowledge users.

Institutions have flexibility in deciding how to use their grant, provided that the funds are used for the payment of current expenditures attributed to federally-sponsored research that falls within the following five categories:

1. Research facilities
2. Research resources
3. Management and administration of an institution's research enterprise
4. Regulatory requirements and accreditation
5. Intellectual property

For more information, see http://www.rsf-fsr.gc.ca/

Mount Allison University acknowledges the contribution of the federal government and Canadian taxpayers to our research enterprise through various grant programs and through the Research Support Fund.

Financial statements FAQ

These FAQs are provided to answer questions that are regularly asked about the University’s financial statements.

If your questions are not answered here, please contact Barb MacIntosh, the University’s controller, at bmacintosh@mta.ca

Financial statements FAQ

How is someone reading the financial statements able to gauge the overall financial health of the University?

To best gauge the financial health of the University and, indeed any not-for-profit organization, the financial statements should be analyzed in their entirety, along with supporting documents. At Mount Allison you can refer to the Annual Financial Report.

In addition, it is useful to pose questions to those tasked with the financial stewardship of the University such as Robert Inglis, vice-president, finance and administration (ringlis@mta.ca) and Barb MacIntosh, controller (bmacintosh@mta.ca).

Reference is often made to different "funds". Why do the financial statements have different funds and what are they?

Under Canadian accounting rules, not-for-profit organizations, like the University, are required to show the observance of restrictions on different funds. Contributions that have limitations put on them by external parities are classified as externally restricted funds.

Even though the annual financial statements consolidate all these funds, the University still must maintain them and it shows the details for each fund in the schedules attached to the financial statements.

The University’s financial statements have eight funds:

  • General Operating Fund
  • Special Program Operating Fund
  • Ancillary Operating Fund
  • Capital Asset Fund
  • Endowment Principal Fund
  • Endowment Expendable Fund
  • Research Fund
  • Special Purpose Fund

Externally restricted funds can only be used for the purpose for which they were given to the University. An explanation of each fund is available in the understanding financial resources section below.

The audited Statement of Operations often shows “revenues over expenses” (or “expenses over revenues”). How does this arise and does it mean there is a surplus or deficit?

Revenues over expenses or expenses over revenue generally arises for two reasons:

1. How capital projects are accounted for

Money spent on small capital projects (minor repairs and upgrades) count as expenses and is reflected in the statement of operations. However, large capital projects (new buildings, major upgrades or repairs) must be accounted for as “assets” and expensed over the lifetime of the building or renovation.

For example, if $1 million from operating funds was spent on new windows for a building and those new windows were expected to last for 40 years, then 1/40th of the cost, or $25,000, would be counted as expenses each year. Although the $1 million was actually spent in the year the work was completed, the financial statements would show $975,000 of revenue over expenses in that year. The $975,000 would be shown as being invested in capital assets at the bottom of the statement of operations.

The Budget document, on the other hand, does show the cost of all capital projects as expenses in the year the revenue was actually used. A reconciliation from the audited financial statements to the budgeted results is in the Annual Financial Report.

2. The Endowment Fund earned more or less than was spent.

The Endowment Fund, like endowment funds at other universities, is designed to adjust for inflation. Actuaries have determined that if we spend 5 per cent each year, current and future members of our community will benefit equally from the Endowment Fund.

In years when the endowment earns more than 5 per cent, the excess is re-invested in the endowment principal and in years when less than 5 per cent is earned, that extra is drawn down from the endowment principal.

Even though amounts earned over 5 per cent are re-invested, they are still accounted for as revenue in our financial statements for endowments that are unrestricted. This can make the balance of revenue over expenses or expenses over revenue change significantly from year to year:

Investment income

  • 2019 - $10,609,003
  • 2018 - $7,351,655
  • 2017 - $13,511,848
  • 2016 - $3,197,841
  • 2015 - $11,277,686

The change in investment income and the types of capital projects completed are two of the main reasons the amount of revenue and expenses can fluctuate significantly from year to year:

  2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Revenues $76,112,161 $73,283,395 $78,809,333 $68,021,741 $74,583,808
Expenses $72,428,856 $70,850,388 $69,848,960 $68,718,358 $66,448,717
Revenues over expenses or (Expenses over revenues) $3,683,305 $2,433,007 $8,960,373 $(696,617) $8,135,091

Is there a surplus (or are there excess funds) in the General Operating Fund?

The General Operating Fund pays for all the academic, administrative, and other operating activities supported by tuition fees, government operating grants, and other revenue (see page 45 of the 2019 audited financial statements included in the Annual Financial Report).

An excess of revenue over expenses in this fund is not a surplus. Revenue in the General Operating Fund also supports activities recorded in other funds. For example, if the General Operating Fund provides a research grant to a faculty member, the amount is transferred to the Research Fund so the faculty member can spend it in support of his or her research. 

After all items, including transfers in and out of the General Operating Fund, were recorded in 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 there was a shortage of funds in 2015, 2018 and 2019 and leftover funds in 2016 and 2017.

  • 2015 - shortage of $712,404 (covered by the Contingency Fund)*
  • 2016 - leftover amount of $374,560 (will be used to support teaching and research space in the Centre for Environmental Innovation project)
  • 2017 - leftover amount of $49,772 (will be used to fund future capital equipment purchases)
  • 2018 - shortage of $835,424 (covered by the Contingency Fund)*
  • 2019 - shortage of $378,198 (partially covered by the Contingency Fund)*

*The Contingency Fund is within the Special Purpose Fund and is supported by the annual spending allocations on unrestricted endowments and unrestricted trusts and unrestricted donations and is used in times of revenue shortfalls or emergency expenditures. See Policy 7202 and the Budget document for more details.

What are the various schedules in the financial statements?

The financial statements are comprised of four main statements or schedules:

  • the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position or balance sheet
  • the Consolidated Statement of Operations or income statement
  • the Consolidated Statement of Changes in Net Assets
  • the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

The Consolidated Statement of Financial Position is a snapshot of the University’s financial position on the last day of the fiscal year.

The Consolidated Statement of Operations presents the University’s consolidated revenue and expenses over a one year period and, along with the Consolidated Statement of Changes in Net Assets, provides the financial statement user with information about the University’s net assets.

The University’s net assets are in five main categories, those that are:

  • invested in capital assets
  • endowed
  • restricted for future pension benefits
  • internally restricted
  • unrestricted

The Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows provides information about how the University’s cash balances changed due to operating, financing, or investing activities.

These statements consolidate all the funds of the University. The three schedules after the notes to the financial statements provide details for each fund.

What are employee future benefit assets and employee future benefit obligations?

These represent amounts determined by our actuary relating to pension and other future commitments to University employees.

What are deferred contributions?

Deferred contributions represent amounts donated or contributed to the University for a specific purpose. Donations or grants received and spent for building projects are called deferred contributions for capital assets and will be recorded as revenues and expenses over time as the building is amortized or depreciated. Donations and grants received for other purposes are called deferred contributions related to restricted and endowed funds. They represent amounts not yet spent and will be recorded as revenues and expenses as they are spent.

Understanding Mount Allison's financial resources

The University receives funding from various sources for various purposes. Much of it comes from external sources with restrictions attached as to its use.

To manage these funds accurately, the University uses “fund accounting” which is a type of accounting system that emphasizes accountability rather than profitability and is used by universities, not-for-profit organizations, and government. Each fund is a self-balancing set of accounts that keeps track of funds and monitors funds coming in and going out by their intended purpose.

The University reports its financial activity in accordance with the Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations as prescribed in Part III of the Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) Canada Handbook and in accordance with Part II of the CPA Canada Handbook for items not addressed in Part III.

Below you will find illustrations of the University’s various funds, showing the major sources of revenue for each fund and what the fund generally supports.



 



 


 



 

 

 


Responsible investing

Mount Allison University is committed to adhering to the principles of responsible investment in its investment policies and practices.

Responsible investment is an approach to investing that aims to incorporate environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors into investment decisions, to better manage risk and generate sustainable, long-term returns.

Integration of environmental, social, and governance factors

Integration of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors into investment policies is considered best practice in relation to responsible investment.

The University's Board of Regents moved ahead with updating its investment policies and practices to incorporate ESG factors in 2017. ESG issues are considered in the selection of investment managers and other service providers.

Examples of ESG factors include:

  • Environmental — climate change, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, resource depletion, waste and pollution, deforestation
  • Social — working conditions, including slavery and child labour; local communities, including Indigenous communities; conflict; health and safety; employee relations; diversity
  • Governance — executive pay, bribery and corruption, political lobbying and donations, board diversity and structure, tax strategy

Read the University's updated investment policy

Disclosure of annual holdings

Mount Allison provides a publicly-available list of the underlying stock and bond holdings in the University's pooled funds.

The endowment fund holdings are posted above in the Financial reports section.

Specific fund option for donors

An investment option for those donors who may be interested in putting new donations into a fund that excludes or limits certain sectors was added in December 2017.

For more information on the ESG Target Fund, contact Jeff Wright, executive director of development, at jrwright@mta.ca

Report on responsible investment

Mount Allison has committed to producing an annual report on the University's responsible investment activities. The first annual report was released for the 2017-18 fiscal year.

United Nations Principles for Responsible Investment (UNPRI)

The UNPRI provides a framework for reporting on and developing responsible investment activities. While the UNPRI is focused primarily on investment managers and investors, investment owners, such as the University, can become signatories. A limited number of Canadian universities are already signatories.

The University became an asset owner signatory in May 2018 and filed its first annual report in April 2019.

Find out more about UNPRI

University Network for Investor Engagement (UNIE)

Mount Allison was one of 10 universities across Canada to be part of the initial February 2021 launch of the national University Network for Investor Engagement (UNIE) through the Shareholder Association for Research & Education. The non-profit organization works to engage with investee companies around environmental, social justice, and governance issues.  

The network, a coalition of Canadian university endowments and pension plans, is a new initiative to engage with North American public companies in the areas of environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG), including carbon footprint and climate risk.

UNIE's engagements focus on accelerating the transition to a low-carbon economy in key sectors where advocacy can make the biggest difference, including energy, utilities, finance, transportation and manufacturing.

Read the full news release 


UNIE Climate Engagement Reports


Advisory group reports

President's Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion

The President’s Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion was tasked with reviewing and providing recommendations for actions to help the University become a more diverse and inclusive community.

» Final Report of the President's Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion (pdf)

Independent Review of Mount Allison University’s Practices and Policies Related to Sexualized Violence
 

The Canadian Centre for Legal Innovation in Sexual Assault Response (CCLISAR) was engaged by the University to form an Independent Review Panel (IRP) to provide recommendations on improving the University’s policies and procedures in response to disclosures and reports of sexual violence.

» Independent Review final report (pdf)


Academic unit reviews

The academic unit review process is an important component of Mount Allison’s commitment to accountability and quality assurance. The process is governed by University Policy 5900 — Academic Unit Reviews and overseen by the Senate Committee on University Planning. The results of reviews are reported to Senate and to the Board of Regents. The co-ordination of all unit reviews is the responsibility of the Office of the Provost and Vice-President, Academic and Research.

Completed academic unit reviews

Environmental responsibility

Environmental and energy initiatives

Mount Allison is continually looking for ways to reduce its environmental footprint.

A summary of energy-conscious initiatives and projects the University has undertaken, or is in the process of reviewing and implementing, is listed below.

COMPLETED PROJECTS

Residences

  • Major residence renovations have included installing energy efficient features such as low flow, dual flush, LED lighting, insulation of exterior walls, roof replacements, new windows, etc. Renovations have taken place in the following residences: 
    • Campbell Hall (2004)
    • Bennett House (2012)
    • Bigelow House (2013)
    • Thornton House (2016)
    • Windsor Hall (2019)
  • Eco-rep program established to improve energy efficiency and energy conservation awareness
  • Dump & Donate program established for year-end move-out in residences to reduce waste
  • LED lighting has been installed throughout the residence system
  • C3 campaign is conducted each year to help raise awareness of and reduce energy consumption
  • Residence furniture is sourced locally and many items are made with recycled material

Dining hall

  • An emphasis on local food purchases — 40 per cent comes from New Brunswick, PEI, and Nova Scotia
  • Bulk purchases of food to reduce packaging waste
  • Cooking oil is cleaned and reused resulting in a 50 per cent reduction in purchase of oil
  • Established a station in Jennings that is never touched by meat — 25 per cent of students are vegetarian or vegan
  • Introduced tray-less dining and a scraping station, which has reduced post-consumer waste by 44 per cent
  • All food waste at Jennings is composted
  • A new dishwasher has been installed that uses 50 per cent less water
  • The wood-fired pizza oven replaced an energy-heavy electric oven
  • Ventilation and lighting upgrades have reduced energy use
  • Added variable speed drives and cooking-level controls to the dining hall kitchen-hood exhaust system to limit fan power usage and fresh-air tempering when no, or low-load cooking, is taking place

Carpentry, trades, and grounds

  • Reduced carbon footprint by switching from fossil-fueled trucks to electric utility vehicles
  • Electric utility vehicles are equipped with solar panel charging systems
  • Switched to environmentally-friendly chemicals for lubricants and graffiti removal
  • Right-sized grounds equipment to eliminate unnecessary large trucks

Energy efficiency

  • Transitioned to occupancy sensors from standard on/off light switching
  • Transitioned to LED lighting technology from fluorescent, incandescent, and other lighting
  • Transitioned to variable speed drive fans and motors in ventilation systems
  • Implementing insulation repair/addition work throughout the steam tunnels and mechanical rooms to mitigate wasteful energy losses from energy transfer piping
  • Boiler plant improvements:
    • Converted fuels from bunker oil to natural gas
    • Converted to computerized combustion controls to increase boiler efficiency
    • Converted boiler feed and condensate return pumps to variable speed
    • Installed a small boiler specifically for summer loads, to avoid running the larger boilers unnecessarily
  • Optimization of lab/fume-hood exhaust system in Barclay Building
  • Addition of heat recovery in buildings with exhaust systems running more than 14 hours per day (e.g. Windsor Hall, Campbell Hall)

 

Projects under evaluation or in the process of being implemented

Snow and ice management

  • Improving annual snow and ice management equipment and processes with the implementation of a brining solution and equipment to reduce the amount of salt used on campus and align us with environmental best practices

Energy metering/dashboards

  • Implementing individual building and campus-wide energy metering (steam, water, and power) to proactively identify energy consumption anomalies, allowing the campus to identify issues with systems/operations prior to excessive energy waste taking place
  • Reviewing/implementing “load-shedding” and building start-stop programming in order to minimize electrical load peaks on campus, thus reducing the NB Power demand charges whenever possible (planned for after power meters are installed)
  • Implementing “Energy Dashboards” across campus for social awareness as it relates to energy/water usage

Energy efficiency

  • Replacing any remaining fluorescent/HID lighting with LED equivalents
  • Implementing insulation repair/addition work throughout the steam tunnels and mechanical rooms to mitigate wasteful energy losses from energy transfer piping
  • Boiler plant improvements:
    • Employing more variable speed drives on boiler fans, etc. and adding additional computerized combustion controls and operating controls to further enhance efficiencies
    • Reviewing the option of the addition of a renewable-energy boiler option using wood chips

Mechanical/electrical system improvements

  • Replacing constant speed pumps with new variable-speed controlled pumps to reduce wasteful mechanical pumping power when not required
  • Implementing/optimizing night-setback controls sequences in buildings to reduce building mechanical/electrical systems run-time during unoccupied times, holidays, snow-days, etc.
  • Implementing/optimizing building heating water temperature controls to minimize pump run-time and minimize steam usage while still providing comfortable temperatures across campus (with the goal of reducing heating water temperatures as much as is practical)
  • Reviewing the option of adding exhaust-air heat recovery to the Barclay lab exhaust fans to recover waste energy and preheat make-up air
Environmental audits

Did you know that Mount Allison conducts an Environmental Audit to assess the progress being made by the University towards achieving environmental sustainability?

The Environmental Audit has been conducted every two to three years since 1998. The audits are conducted by Mount Allison students as summer employment.

The audits use the performance indicators listed in Policy 2102: Environmental Policy and Policy 2101: Emission Reduction Policy to evaluate the University’s progress towards the carbon footprint reduction targets.

Environmental Audit reports

 

 


Facilities reports

Physical accessibility


Mount Allison's approach to facilities development and physical accessibility is guided by our Accessible Facilities Policy and regular communication with University community members, including student leaders.

The policy’s appendices indicate work that has been done or is planned to make University facilities more accessible. The University’s campus plan also includes a section about accessibility.

Find out more

Water testing

Mount Allison has a comprehensive plan for water testing. Following Health Canada guidelines, Facilities Management has developed a plan to test the water in campus buildings for lead on a five to seven-year cycle.

Please address any questions to the director of Facilities Management at nmaceachern@mta.ca

 

When will your building be tested

2022-23

Dunn Building
Edwards House
Facilities Management buildings
Fawcett Building
Flemington Building

2023-24

Hammond House
Harper Hall
Hart Hall
Hunton House
Jennings Hall
Marjorie Young Bell Music Conservatory

2024-25

Owens Art Gallery
President’s Cottage
Purdy Crawford Centre for the Arts
R.P. Bell Library
University Chapel
Wallace McCain Student Centre
Windsor Hall
York Street Daycare

2025-26

The Anchorage
Athletic Centre
Avard-Dixon Building
Barclay Building
Bennett Building
Bennett House
Bermuda House
Bigelow House
Carriage House

2026-27

Campbell Hall
Centennial Hall
Colville House
Convocation Hall
Crabtree Building
Thornton House

 

 

Testing protocol

The following protocol is used to carry out the testing:

  • Locations are determined in consultation with building contacts from each building and represent locations where individuals could consume the water.
  • The samples are analyzed by a certified laboratory.
  • The testing protocol used was recommended by the New Brunswick Department of Health.
    • A sample is taken from the cold water tap as soon as the tap is opened (first draw). These samples are sent to the lab for analysis.
    • For all locations where lead levels are found to be above the guideline on first draw, a second sample is taken after the water has run for 30 seconds (second draw).

Drinking water guidelines

In March 2019, Health Canada lowered the drinking water guidelines for lead from 10 micrograms per litre (ug/L) to 5 micrograms per litre, as measured on the second draw after a 30 second flush.

All testing carried out after March 2019 uses 5 ug/L as the guideline. Testing carried out prior to March 2019 follows the 10 ug/L guideline. 

 

WATER TESTING RESULTS

The most recent results for each building have been posted. Previous results are available from Facilities Management.

Summer 2021

The water in the following buildings was tested for lead on May 12, June 9, and Aug. 9, 2021:

  • Campbell Hall
  • Centennial Hall
  • Colville House
  • Convocation Hall
  • Crabtree Building
  • Thornton House

Of the 193 locations tested:

  • 141 locations tested below lead levels of 5 ug/L on the first draw
  • 52 locations were retested with a second draw
  • 2 locations had a result above the 5 ug/L guideline on second draw

Those two locations are as follows:

  • Two sinks in Campbell Hall.
    • The faucets and valves were replaced.
    • Upon retesting, these two locations tested below lead levels of 5 ug/L.

Full results of the testing by building (pdf)


June and July 2020

The water in the following buildings was tested for lead on June 11 and July 8, 2020

  • The Anchorage
  • Athletic Centre
  • Avard-Dixon
  • Barclay Building
  • Bennett Building
  • Bennett House
  • Bermuda House
  • Bigelow House
  • Carriage House

Of the 126 locations tested:

  • 106 locations tested below lead levels of 5 ug/L on the first draw
  • 20 locations were retested with a second draw
  • 0 locations had a result above the 5 ug/L guideline on second draw

Full results of the testing by building (pdf)


May and August 2019

The water in the following buildings was tested for lead on May 15, 2019 and Aug. 8, 2019:

  • Owens Art Gallery
  • President's Cottage
  • Purdy Crawford Centre for the Arts
  • R. P. Bell Library
  • University Chapel
  • Wallace McCain Student Centre
  • York Street Children's Centre
  • Windsor Hall

Of the 209 locations tested:

  • 155 locations tested below lead levels of 5 ug/L on the first draw
  • 53 locations were retested with a second draw
  • 1 location had a result above the 5 ug/L guideline on second draw

The one location that had a result above the guideline on second draw — a sink in the Owens basement Conservation Laboratory — had its faucet replaced and the water was retested and met the guidelines.

Full results of the testing by building (pdf)


May and July 2018

The water in the following buildings was tested for lead on May 1, 2018 and July 11, 2018:

  • Gairdner Building
  • Hammond House
  • Harper Hall
  • Hart Hall
  • Hunton House
  • Jennings Hall
  • Marjorie Young Bell Conservatory of Music

Of the 145 locations tested:

  • 138 locations tested below lead levels of 10 ug/L on the first draw
  •  7 locations were retested with a second draw
  •  1 location had a result above the 10 ug/L guideline on second draw

The one location that had a result above the guideline on second draw — a sink in an office on the main floor of the Music Conservatory — had its faucet and valves replaced and the water was retested.

Full results of the testing by building (pdf)


May 2017

The water in the following buildings was tested for lead on May 17, 2017:

  • Dunn Building
  • Edwards House
  • Facilities Management Building
  • Fawcett Building
  • Flemington Building

Of the 101 locations tested:

  • 89 locations tested below lead levels of 10 ug/L on the first draw
  • 12 locations were retested with a second draw
  • 0 locations had a result above the 10 ug/L guideline on second draw

Full results of the testing by building (pdf)

Asbestos management

Facilities Management maintains an inventory of all campus buildings that contain asbestos.

You can obtain copies of the reports by contacting Facilities Management at fixit@mta.ca.

 


Right to information

Request a record

Under New Brunswick's Right to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (RTIPPA), anyone may:

  • request access to records related to the public business of the University
  • access records containing personal information about themselves
  • request corrections to records containing personal information about themselves

The vice-president, finance and administration is responsible for administering access to information and protection of privacy policies and procedures for the University.

The following University policies and provincial acts govern access to information and protection of personal privacy at Mount Allison:

Please direct all RTIPPA and related inquiries to the Office of the Vice-President, Finance and Administration at hbembridge@mta.ca or 506-364-2630.

 


Atlantic Common University Data Set

The Atlantic Provinces’ universities have worked co-operatively to develop and assemble the Atlantic Common University Data Set (ACUDS).

This is an online tool for students, parents, and the public that complements the extensive amount of information that universities make publicly available. This dataset allows users to access and compare data based on common definitions and displayed in a similar format.

A. General information

Mailing Address
62 York Street
Sackville New Brunswick
E4L 1E2
Canada

Street Address
65 York Street
Sackville New Brunswick
E4L 1E4
Canada

Admissions Information
65 York Street
Sackville New Brunswick
Canada

Phone: 506-364-2269
Fax: 506-364-2272
Email: admissions@mta.ca  

Main Phone Number
506 364 2269

Internet Address
http://www.mta.ca  

 

Section A2 - Qualifications offered / awarded
Degree / Diploma / Certificate:
Offered?
No. awarded in calendar
year 2018
Undergraduate Certificate:
Yes
0
Undergraduate Diploma:
Yes
0
Bachelor's Degree:
Yes
498
Graduate Certificate:
No
0
Graduate Diploma:
Yes
0
Master's Degree:
Yes
4
Doctoral Degree:
Yes
0

Note: Includes all degrees/diplomas/certificates that are offered/awarded.
*Second entry professional degrees include: Law, Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Veterinary Medicine, Theology, Consecutive Education

 

Section A3 - Degrees Conferred by program, 2018

Number of degrees conferred in the calendar year 2018.
Program Bachelors and 1st professional degree Master's Degree
Agriculture and Biological Science 54 2
Business and Commerce 54 -
Computer Science 6 -
Fine and Applied Arts 31 -
Humanities 59 -
Mathematics 7 -
Other Arts and Science 67 -
Physical Sciences 54 2
Social Sciences 93 -
Theology 3 -
     
Total: Domestic Degrees Conferred1 498 4

 (1) Total: Domestic Degrees as reported in 2018

 

Section A4 - Male Enrolment by Program, 2018

Number of degree seeking students (headcount) enrolled for Fall 2018, including domestic and international students.
Program Bachelors &
1st Professional Degree
Master's Degree
Full Time Enrolment Part Time Enrolment Full time enrolment
Agriculture & Biological Sciences 56 1 4
Buisiness and Commerce 138 7 -
Computer Science 38 2 -
Fine & Applied Arts 56 1 -
Humanities 80 3 -
Mathematics 15 1 -
Other Arts & Sciences 240 12 -
Physical Sciences 138 3 3
Social Sciences 112 1 -
Theology and Religious Studies 2 1 -
       
Total: Domestic Enrolment1 802 30 4
Total: International Enrolment 72 2 3

(1) Total: Domestic Enrolment as reported in 2018
Note: The figures above do not necessarily include coop enrolment and work term enrolment.

 

Section A5 - Female Enrolment by Program, 2018

Number of degree seeking students (headcount) enrolled for Fall 2018, including domestic and international students.
Program Bachelors &
1st Professional Degree
Master's Degree
Full time Enrolment Part Time Enrolment Full time enrolment
Agriculture & Biological Sciences 144 - 10
Buisiness and Commerce 85 1 -
Computer Science 14 2 -
Fine & Applied Arts 120 3 -
Humanities 109 1 -
Mathematics 11 - -
Other Arts & Sciences 454 8 -
Physical Sciences 112 2 1
Social Sciences 146 5 -
Theology and Religious Studies 9 1 -
       
Total: Domestic Enrolment1 1098 20 9
Total: International Enrolment 106 3 2

(1) Total: Domestic Enrolment as reported in 2018

More detailed information by program: http://www.mta.ca/academics  

 

Section A6 - Total Enrolment by Program, 2018

Number of degree seeking students (headcount) enrolled for Fall 2018, including domestic and international students.
Program Bachelors &
1st Professional Degree
Master's Degree
Full time Enrolment Part Time Enrolment Full time Enrolment
Agriculture & Biological Sciences 200 1 14
Buisiness and Commerce 223 8 -
Computer Science 52 4 -
Fine & Applied Arts 176 4 -
Humanities 189 4 -
Mathematics 26 1 -
Other Arts & Sciences 693 20 -
Physical Sciences 250 5 4
Social Sciences 258 5 -
Theology and Religious Studies 11 2 -
       
Total: Domestic Enrolment1 1899 49 14
Total: International Enrolment2 178 5 5

(1) Total: Domestic Enrolment as reported in 2018
(2) Total: International Enrolment as reported in 2018

More detailed information by program: http://www.mta.ca/academics  

 

Section A7 - Full-Time Enrolment by Immigration Status, Fall 2018

Number of degree seeking international full-time students (headcount) enrolled for Fall 2018.
  Bachelors &
1st Professional Degree
Master's Degree
Canadian Enrolment Student Visa Enrolment Canadian Enrolment Student Visa Enrolment
Total International Students 1899 178 14 5
B. Admission

Section B1 Registrants by Program, 2018

Full-time, first-year registrants in first entry programs by type and program
 

Bachelor of Arts: 296
Bachelor of Science: 256
Bachelor of Commerce: 53
Bachelor of Fine Arts: 17
Bachelor of Music: 18

Total registrants: 640 

 

Section B2

Program Undergraduate Admission Requirements  
 

For more information on Mount Allison's admissions process, including admission requirements, visit http://www.mta.ca/admissions/

For more detailed information and up-to-date policy on admission requirements, visit http://www.mta.ca/admissions/  

 

Section B3

Secondary School Entering Averages of Full-Time, First Year Students by Range and Program, 2018  
 

The following tables show the percentage of full-time, first year students by range and program. Averages are based on final grades for Grade 12 university destination courses.

Degree 95%+ 90-94% 85-89% 80-84% 75-79% 70-74% <70% Overall Avg
Bachelor of Arts 8.2% 20.6% 25.1% 21.1% 12.8% 10.0% 2.2% 84.9%
Bachelor of Science 16.3% 29.6% 25.7% 16.4 8.0% 3.6% 0.4% 88.3%
Bachelor of Commerce 5.1% 23.0% 30.9% 19.1% 16.9% 3.9% 1.1% 85.7%
Bachelor of Music 21.2% 28.8% 24.2% 13.6% 9.1 3.0 - 88.8%
Bachelor of Fine Arts 12.5% 30.4% 25.0% 19.6% 12.5 - - 87.9
                 
Overall 1.3% 6.6% 11.3% 18.9% 25.8 24.7% 11.5% 86.4%

 

Sections B4 / B5 / B6

Application fee / Students accepted for a term other than fall / Deferred admission
 

Application fees

  • Online Application Fee: $50  
  • Paper Application Fee: $60  

Admission in Winter, Spring, Summer terms
Are first-year students accepted for terms other than the fall? Yes 

Note: Please see URL http://www.mta.ca/apply/


Deferred admission
Does your institution allow students to postpone enrolment after admission? Yes

If yes, maximum period of postponement: one year

Note: Please see URL http://www.mta.ca/apply/

 

If you have any questions or comments please contact Jonathan Parsons, Institutional Reporting and Data Analysis

C. Transfer admission from other post-secondary institutions

Sections C1 / C2 / C3

Transfer Admission From Other Postsecondary Institutions

Enrolment of Transfer Students

Do you enrol transfer students in first entry undergraduate programs? Yes

If yes above, may transfer students earn advanced standing credit by transferring credits earned from course work completed at other colleges/universities? Yes

For more information, please see: http://www.mta.ca/requirements

Transfer Students

Number of students who applied and enrolled as degree-seeking transfer students in Fall 2018:

Applicants: 192
Registrants: 96

Transfer students are those students who attended another postsecondary institution.

Transfer Credit Policies

http://www.mta.ca/requirements

Source: Individual Institutions
 

D. Library collections

Section D1

Library Collections

The number of holdings for the 2016-17 year for each of the following categories:

  • Monograph Titles - Print Titles: 632,870
  • Monograph Titles - Electronic Titles: 27,917
  • Microform units: 83,398
  • Government Documents: N/A (included in monograph titles)
  • Manuscripts and Archives: N/A
  • Printed Music Scores: 17,694
  • Cartographic Materials: 22,928 (# of sheets)
  • Graphic Materials: 1,523
  • Audio Materials: 8,570
  • Film & Video Materials: 5,410
  • Serials - Print & Microform: 22,237
  • Serials - Electronic: N/A (Included in aggregators)
  • Serials - Electronic in aggregators: 218,021

For more information visit Mount Allison University Library.

E. Student life

Section E1

Residence of First-Time, Full-Time, First Year Undergraduate Students in Previous Year

The following is the percentage of first-time, full-time first-year undergraduate students enrolled in fall 2018 by their home address in the previous year:

Per cent from New Brunswick: 45.0%
Per cent from rest of Canada: 43.4%
Per cent from outside Canada: 11.6%

Section E2

Percentage of Full-Time, Undergraduate Students who live on campus, Fall 2018

First Year: 86.1%
Total Undergraduate: 67.0%

Section E3

Extracurricular Activities Offered

For a full description of all of the extracurricular clubs and activities, please visit http://www.mta.ca/studentlife/

Section E4

Housing

For a full description of all of our housing options, please visit http://www.mta.ca/residence

F. Student experience information


Section F1

Results from the NSSE (National Survey of Student Engagement) 2017 Survey
How would you evaluate your entire educational experience at this institution?
  Excellent Good Fair Poor
First Year 33.5% 49.5% 14.1% 2.9%
Senior Year 47.2% 43.5% 8.3% 1.0%
 
If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending?
  Definitely Yes Probably Yes Probably No Definitely No
First Year 44.8% 39.2% 10.7% 5.3%
Senior Year 43.8% 41.1% 12.0% 3.1%

 

Section F2 

Results from the CGPSS (Canadian Graduate Professional Student Survey)

Did not participate


Section F3

Results from the CUSC 2018 Survey
  Strongly Agree / Very Satisfied Agree / Satisfied Disagree / Dissatisfied Disagree strongly / Very Dissatisfied
Generally, I am satisfied with
the quality of teaching I have received
25.1% 68.4% 4.3% 2.1%
Satisfaction with concern shown by the university for students as individuals 14.4% 66.3% 16.0% 3.2%
I am satisfied with my decision to
attend this university
43.3% 47.6% 6.4% 2.7%

If you have any questions or comments please contact Jonathan Parsons, Institutional Reporting and Data Analysis

G. Annual student expenses

Section G1

Annual Expenses
First-year average undergraduate arts and science full-time tuition, ancillary fees, room and board, and other expenses, 2019-20.
  Domestic International
Tuition Fees: $8,770 (NB residents discounted tuition: $8,380) $18,130
Ancillary Fees: see web see web
 
Room and Board (on-campus): see web see web
Room Only (on-campus): see web see web
Board Only (on-campus meal plan): see web see web
Books and Supplies: see web see web
Transportation: see web see web
Other Expenses: see web see web
TOTAL: $8,770 $18,130


Note: These expenses are for the full 2019-20 academic year, which refers to the period of time generally extending from September to June, usually equated to two semesters or three trimesters. Ancillary fees include only charges that all full-time students must pay that are not included in tuition (e.g., registration, health, or activity fees) and do not include optional fees (e.g., parking, laboratory use).


For more detailed information on fees:
http://www.mta.ca/Registrars_Office/Tuition_and_fees/Tuition___fees/

Additional Note: Please see URL listed above for further details on costs.

 

If you have any questions or comments please contact Jonathan Parsons, Institutional Reporting and Data Analysis

H. Instructional faculty and class size

Section H1

Instructional Faculty and Class Size
Instructional faculty members (excluding clinicians) in each category for Fall 2018:
  Full-time Part-time (FTE)
Total number of instructional faculty: 133 25
Total number who are women: 62 9
Total number with doctorate, first professional, or other highest level degree: 133 18



Section H2

Undergraduate Class Size by Year Level, 2018
Class Sections  
  1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year
  (#) (%) (#) (%) (#) (%) (#) (%)
< 30 students 61 45.5% 106 67.5% 209 85.0% 229 98.7%
30-60 students 35 26.1% 34 21.7% 32 13.0% 3 1.3%
61-100 students 19 14.2% 13 8.3% 5 2.0% 0 0%
101-250 students 19 14.2% 4 2.5% 0 0% 0 0%
251+ students 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
TOTAL 134 % 157 % 246 % 132 0%
 
Class Sub Sections (i.e. lab, tutorial)  
< 30 students 69 72.6% 50 74.6% 33 100.0% 10 100%
30-60 students 26 27.4% 17 25.4% 0 % 0 %
TOTAL 95 % 67 % 33 % 10 %

 
Note: There are a number of one-on-one instruction classes, including independent study and practicums at our institution. The following are the number of these classes by year level. Data on subsectioning may not be complete in all cases, as many departments schedule these subsections without notifying the central Scheduling Office:
 
1st year: 1
2nd year: 3
3rd year: 8
4th year: 137

Total: 152
 

If you have any questions or comments please contact Jonathan Parsons, Institutional Reporting and Data Analysis

I. University revenue and expenses

Section I1. University Revenue

University revenue figures for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2017 as reported to CAUBO (Canadian Association of University Business Officers).
 
  Sponsored resea rch  
Funds General operating Special purpos   e
and trust
Entities Consolidat   ed Entities not Conso    lidated Sub-total Ancillary Capital Endowment Total funds
Federal Government departments and agencies grants and c  ontra         cts
1. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council 0 0 264 0 264 0 0 0 264
2. Health      Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
      3. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council       0 0 1,149 0 1,149 0 0 0 1,149
4. Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5. Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) 0 0 291 0 291 0 0 0 291
6. Canada Research Chairs 0 0 517 0 517 0 0 0 517
7. Other federal 0 4992 956 0 956 0 0 0 5948
Total Federal Government deapartments and agencies grants and contracts (Lines 1-7) 0 4,992 3,177 0 3,177 0 3,177 0 3,019
Other Government departments and agencies grants and contracts
8. Provincial 21,781 425 524 0 524 0 0 0 22,730
9. Municipal 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
10. Other provinces 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11. Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Other Government departments and agencies grants and contracts (Lines 8 11) 21781 426 524 0 524 0 0 0 22,731
Total Government departments and agencies grants and contracts (Line 1 -11) 21,781 5,418 3,701 0 3,701 0 0 0 30,899
Tuition and other fees
12. Credit course tuition 18,785 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18,785
13. Non-credit tuition 268 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 268
14. Other fees 1,138 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,138
Total Tuition and other fees (lines 12 -14) 20,191 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,191
Donations, including bequests
15. Individuals 135 876 0 0 0 0 0 4,843 5,854
16. Business enterprises 1 164 0 0 0 0 0 543 708
17. Not-for-profit organizations 48 686 0 0 0 0 0 1,946 2,680
Total Donations, including bequests (lines 15-17) 184 1,726 0 0 0 0 0 7,332 9,242
Non-government grants and contracts
18. Individuals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
19. Business enterprises 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
20. Not-for-profit organizations 0 0 1,121 0 1,121 0 0 0 1,121
Total Non-government grants and contracts (lines 18 - 20) 0 0 1,121 0 1,121 0 0 0 1,121
Investment
21. Endowment 1,920 5,938 0 0 0 0 0 (1,021) 6,836
22. Other investment 354 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 354
Total Investment (lines 21 - 22) 2,274 5,938 0 0 0 0 0 (1,021) 7,190
Other income
23. Sale of services and products 896 26 0 0 0 12,494 0 0 13,416
24. Miscellaneous 165 66 0 0 0 0 0 0 232
Total Other income (lines 23 - 24) 1061 92 0 0 0 12,494 0 0 13,648
Total - Non-Government Income (lines 12 - 24) 23,710 7,756 1,121 0 1,121 12,494 0 6,311 51,392
25. Total (lines 1 - 24) 45,491 13,174 4,821 0 4,821 12,494 0 6,311 82,291

 



Section I2. University Expenses

University expense figures for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2017 as reported to CAUBO (Canadian Association of University Business Officers).
 
General Expendable Funds Restricted Expendable Funds
  Sponsored Research  
  General Operating Special purpose and Trust Entities Consolidated Entities Not Consolidated Subtotal Ancillary Capital Endowment Total
Salaries and Wages
1. Academic Ranks 17,484 957 34 0 34 0 0 0 18,474
2. Other Instruction & Research 1,291 32 1,281 0 1,281 0 0 0 2,604
3. Other Salaries & Wages 10,758 2,146 654 0 654 2,346 0 0 15,904
4. Employee Benefits 4,160 382 83 0 83 425 0 0 5,050
Total Salaries and Benefits 1-4 33,693 3,517 2,052 0 2,052 2,771 0 0 42,032
5. Travel 982 340 486 0 486 23 0 0 1,830
6. Library Acquisitions 503 435 0 0 0 0 0 0 938
7. Printing and Duplicating 203 36 0 0 0 10 0 0 250
8. Materials and Supplies 944 247 701 0 701 195 0 0 2088
9.Communications 309 1 4 0 4 70 0 0 384
10. Other Operational Expenditures 1,313 276 13 0 13 523 0 0 2,125
11. Utilities 2,023 0 0 0 0 1,213 0 0 3,236
12. Renovations and Alterations 363 344 1 0 1 182 0 0 890
13. Scholarships, Bursaries, etc. 426 3,145 7 0 7 0 0 0 3,577
14. Externally Contracted Services 570 357 88 0 88 3,221 0 0 4,235
15. Professional Fees 292 860 139 0 139 4 0 0 1,295
16. Cost of Goods Sold 13 0 0 0 0 1,124 0 0 1,137
17. Interest 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3
18. Furniture and Equipment Purchases 279 557 442 0 442 539 0 0 1,817
19. Equipment Rental and Maintenance 1,097 32 20 0 20 350 0 0 1,499
20. Internal sales and cost recoveries (889) 49 836 0 836 4 0 0 0
21. Total (lines 5-20) 8,428 6,679 2,737 0 2,737 7,461 0 0 25,304
22. Buildings, land and land improvements 1,579 7,472 0 0 0 2,215 5,846 0 17,111
23. Lump sum payments 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total (lines 1-23) 43,700 17,667 4,788 0 4,788 12,447 5,846 0 84,448

 

If you have any questions or comments please contact Jonathan Parsons, Institutional Reporting and Data Analysis

J. Research

Section J

Research Awards, by Granting Council

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) 2017-2018
All Payments by Program Activity 2017-18. Excludes indirect costs.

Number of awards: 4
Funding ($): $100,148

Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) 2017-18
Table 13: Grants and Scholarships by University/College.

Number of awards: 30
Funding ($): $885,561

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) 2017-18
CIHR Funding Database. Funding Type: All

Number of awards: 0
Funding ($): $0

Sources: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

K. Other useful information

Section K2

Key Performance Indicators

Degree Completion Rate for Undergraduate Cohort, Fall 2013, New, Year 1 Students

Program and graduation rate (%)

  • Business and Commerce: 72.6%
  • Fine and Applied Arts: 78.3%
  • Other Arts and Science: 65.6%

Total new full-time year one undergraduate students enrolled in fall 2013: 648

Total students reported above who graduated by 2018: 391      

Section K3

Retention Rates 2018

The percentage of first-time, full-time first year students in a given fall term who returned to the institution in the next fall term.

Year 1 to Year 2 Retention Rate 2017 to 2018: 76.5%

If you have any questions or comments about the ACUDS, please contact Jonathan Parsons, Institutional Reporting and Data Analysis, jparsons@mta.ca.