Choose your courses and plan your schedule for the upcoming academic year. You can also find out more about special courses.

Once you know the course requirements for your program, you can plan what classes you're going to take in the upcoming academic year.

Not sure what courses you need? Visit advising and degree planning.

New student? Visit RegHelp for new students for advice and tips on course selection and registration.


Select your courses

To see courses being offered in the upcoming or current academic year, visit Self-Service > Course Catalog.

When making your course selections, please ensure you meet all course prerequisites and co-requisites (e.g. labs/tutorials).

Course load information

Normal course load

Full-time students are expected to register for the equivalent of 30 credits in the Fall and Winter terms, normally 15 credits per term. 

Most courses are 3-credit courses offered in one term. Refer to Academic Calendar 11.0 Course Numbering and Credit Values

If you intend to carry a normal course load you should register for 10 courses in total - five courses (15 credits) in the fall term, and five courses (15 credits) in the winter term. 

Every degree program requires completion of 120 credits in total:

15 credits per term X 2 terms = 30 credits per year
30 credits per year X 4 years = 120 credits

Nine credits per term is the minimum course load required to be considered a full-time student. Registration in three to six credits per term is considered part-time enrollment. 

Keep in mind, in addition to the regular class (lecture), a number of courses also involve a mandatory lab or tutorial component. Labs/tutorials do not count as separate courses or credits in your registration. 

Reduced course load

Here are some things to consider as you determine the number of courses you will take in a term:

  • If you have a University scholarship you are most likely required to enroll in 15 credits per term (Fall and Winter) in order to meet criteria for renewal in the following year. This is the case even if you enter with transfer credits / advanced standing.
  • Other types of funding agencies normally have a course load requirement (e.g. Government Student Loans). Check directly with your funding agency if you have questions about this.
  • There is a course load requirement to qualify for Dean's List standing.
  • International students considering a part-time load should consult with the International Student Advisor (intadvisor@mta.ca) to discuss immigration implications.
  • International students who speak English as an additional language may wish to consult with the International Student Advisor (intadvisor@mta.ca) to discuss course load recommendations.
  • Students with disabilities may wish to consult with the Meighen Centre for a course load recommendation.
  • Taking fewer courses may help to reduce stress, maintain or improve mental health, and ease the transition to university. It can also allow more study time for each course to improve grades.
  • Consider other commitments you may have such as co-curricular involvement, volunteer or paid work, or family commitments. Varsity athletes sometimes take a reduced course load in season.
  • Think about what makes sense for you and find a balance that works. Everybody has a different learning experience, and you have options. Plan for what will meet your needs.
  • Keep in mind, if you take less than 15 credits per term plan how you will 'make up' for the missed credits (spring/summer courses, overloading, returning for an additional year of study).

Questions? Email advisor@mta.ca.

Course overload

The permission of the appropriate Academic Dean is required for registration above 18 credits per term. To access the permission request form, go through Self-Service.

  • Students with first-year standing are not permitted to register for more than 15 credits per term. Under exceptional circumstances first-year students may be permitted to overload in the Winter term if they achieve a TGPA of at least 3.5 in the Fall term.
  • Students with second- or third-year standing who are in Good Standing may register for up to 18 credits per term, provided they have attained a TGPA of at least 2.0 in the previous Fall or Winter term. Students in Good Standing who do not meet this requirement must have permission from the appropriate Academic Dean in order to register for overload credits.
  • Students with fourth-year standing who are in Good Standing may register for up to 18 credits per term. Students who are not in Good Standing must have permission from the appropriate Academic Dean in order to register for overload credits.

Questions? Email regoffice@mta.ca.

Plan your schedule

To help plan your courses before your register, you can use a blank timetable template to make sure your courses fit in your schedule. You can also include backup courses in this worksheet in case the courses you want to take are full.

Ready to register for courses? Visit course registration.


About courses

Course delivery formats

The course delivery format for each individual course is clearly indicated in Self-Service. Please check each course component carefully — lectures and labs/tutorials for a single course may be delivered in different formats.

  • Sackville: Students are expected to be on campus and participate on the day and time listed on the timetable.
  • Scheduled, online only: Students are not required to be on campus but are expected to participate on the day and time listed on the timetable.
  • Unscheduled, online only: Students are not required to be on campus and there are no scheduled meeting times.

A-Term courses

The A-Term is a two-week intensive course period at the beginning of the fall term (normally the last two weeks of August). During this session, students may complete an entire 3-credit course or an intensive portion of a fall term course that continues through to December.

A-Term FAQ

What is the A-Term?
The A-Term is a two-week intensive course period at the beginning of the fall term (normally the last two weeks of August). During this session, students may complete an entire 3-credit course or an intensive portion of a fall term course that continues through to December.

Are A-Term courses part of the spring/summer term or the fall term?
A-Term courses are part of the fall term.

Are additional tuition and fees charged for A-Term courses?
Tuition for A-Term courses are factored into fall term fees. Some A-Term courses may incur additional fees and expenses (travel, accommodations, etc.)

How many A-Term courses can I register for?
You can register for a maximum of one 3-credit A-Term course each academic year.

What is the registration deadline for A-Term courses?
Please consult the Academic dates and deadlines page for the deadline to register for specific A-Term courses. Late registrations will not be considered.

What is the withdrawal deadline for A-Term courses?
Please consult the Academic dates and deadlines page for the deadline to withdraw without academic penalty from specific A-Term courses.

Do I have to participate in the A-Term?
No, registration in an A-Term course is optional. You will not have to complete an A-Term course to satisfy mandatory degree or program requirements.

If I take one A-Term course, and 6 credits in the fall term, will I still be considered full-time?
No, in addition to an A-Term course you must be registered for at least 9 credits in the regular fall term to be considered a full-time student.

If I take an A-Term course, do I still have to register for 15 credits in the fall term to have a full course load?
No. Your A-Term course counts towards your fall registration. If you register for an additional 12 credits in the fall term, this will be considered a full course load.

How will an A-Term course impact my course load requirements for scholarship renewal? If I meet all other criteria, will I still be eligible for renewal if I take one A-Term course as part of my required course load?
Yes, an A-Term course counts as 3-credits in your fall registration towards your course load requirements for scholarship renewal.  

I am not eligible to overload. Can I still take one A-Term course and 15 credits in the fall term without special permission?
No, this would require approval of a Dean. Registration in an A-Term course, and 12 additional credits in the Fall term would be considered a full course load.

How will taking an A-Term course affect my eligibility as a varsity athlete?
You should discuss this with your coach and the Athletics staff. The course would be registered as a fall term course, but your practice schedule may impact your ability to participate in the A-Term.

I am an international student. If I take one A-Term course, and 6 credits in the fall term, will I still be considered a full-time student for immigration purposes? How many hours can I work off-campus if I take one A-Term course, and 6 credits in the fall term?
Yes, international students registered in 3-credits in the A-Term and 6 credits in the regular fall term will be considered full-time for immigration purposes, and reporting to IRCC. In this case, international students are still limited to working 20 hours per week off-campus.

How will registration in an A-Term course appear on my academic transcript?
An A-Term course will appear as a fall term course on your transcript and will not be distinguishable from regular fall term registrations.

When are grades available for A-term courses?
Grades will be available at the end of the fall term.

How will I know if a course is scheduled for the A-Term?
A-Term courses will be designated by the specific section codes P and Q (e.g. SUBJ-X991-P) on the timetable and in the course registration system. We will also publish an annual list of A-Term course offerings.

Do all A-Term courses require me to be on campus?
Not necessarily. Because there are no other course conflicts, this session allows for courses to happen anywhere. Some courses may involve travel or learning experiences away from campus.

Will any A-Term courses be offered in an unscheduled online-only format?
A-Term courses can be offered in any format.

A-Term courses - Fall 2024

INDG/CENL 3601-P
Social Aspects of Place

August 19-23, 2024

DRAM/SCRN 3991-P
Edinburgh Fringe

Field school, August 15-27, 2024
Application deadline: November 15, 2023

Courses without prerequisites

Any student may register for a course without prerequisites. First-year students, keep in mind that there may be additional winter term courses available to you if you fill a prerequisite in the fall.

What is a prerequisite course?

A prerequisite course is one that must be successfully completed before you begin a second course.

You may register for courses that have prerequisites in the winter term provided that you are registered for the prerequisite course in the fall (or have successfully completed it in a previous term).

A grade of C- or better must be obtained in order to use a course to fill a prerequisite.

List of courses without prerequisites

Special topic courses

Special topic courses either focus on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department of program, or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program.

Special topic courses — Spring/Summer 2024

ARTH 3991-Z (3 CR)
AVANTE-GARDE CINEMA

Prereqs: ARTH 2101 (or FINH 2101); ARTH/MUSE 2111 (or FINH 2111); or permission of the Department
This course consists of a survey of avant-garde cinema from the late 19th century to the present. It will examine the cinematic contributions to major avant-garde schools and movements such as German Expressionism, Abstraction, Surrealism, and Situationist International, as well as styles and genres specific to film, including Soviet montage, the psychodrama, the structural film, Third Cinema, and the tone-poem. Relevant social and political issues, such as feminism, Marxism, colonialism, psychoanalysis, and existentialism, will also be addressed. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with SCRN 3991 Avante-Garde Cinema and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

BIOL 3991-Z (3 CR)
CONSERVATION PHYSIOLOGY

Prereq: Third or fourth-year standing; BIOL 2401; BIOL 2101; 3 credits from BIOL 3201, 3811 recommended
This course is designed for Mount Allison students to study collaboratively with students from Universidad de San Francisco de Quito (USFQ) to learn about the conservation of animals in each individual country. Students will learn about the climate/environmental challenges in both Canada and Ecuador, and work to understand animal physiology and use this knowledge to determine if/how animals will respond to climate change, and how we can use that information to help with conservation management. (Format: Field School)
Note: The application deadline for this field school was November 15, 2023

GENS 3991-Z (3 CR)
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

Prereqs: Third-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course will examine the major global changes influencing earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere (including cryosphere), lithosphere, and biosphere. Lectures will investigate the causes and impacts of a variety of global change issues, including potential solutions. Tutorial/laboratory sessions will explore how scientific information about global change are communicated across diverse platforms to stakeholders.

PSYC 2991-Z (3 CR)
PERSONALITY AT WORK

Prereq: Second-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; or permission of the Department
Personality is essential in understanding why people think, feel, and behave the way they do at the workplace. This course will focus on the role of individual differences in predicting and determining behavior at work. Topics include important aspects of work such as motivation, job performance, employee attitudes, leadership, teamwork, stress, turnover, personality assessment and application of personality to the psychology of work.

PSYC 2991-Q (3 CR)
CROSS-CULTURAL SEXUALITY

Prereq: Second-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; or permission of the Department
This course is an overview of sexuality and sex education from a cross-cultural perspective. The focus will be on social and cultural influences on sexuality. There is a specific focus on comparing the Netherlands and Canada, but we will also explore perspectives in other countries. This class will take place in Utrecht, Netherlands. (Format: Field School)
Note: The application deadline for this field school was November 15, 2023

RELG 3991-Z (3 CR)
THE CAMINO

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor
Taking the historic 'Way of St. James' in Northern Spain as the key point of reference, this course compares traditions of religious pilgrimage to contemporary instances of journeying, travel and human movement. How does traditional pilgrimage compare with contemporary issues from both within and beyond the traditional religious context? Students will have the opportunity to undertake a section of the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route and along the way consider such topics as contemporary eco-tourism, political protest and, secular 'civic' religiosity.
Note: Please contact the course instructor directly for information about this field school course.

SCRN 3991-Z (3 CR)
AVANTE-GARDE CINEMA

Prereq: Third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; SCRN 1001; or permission of the Program Director
This course consists of a survey of avant-garde cinema from the late 19th century to the present. It will examine the cinematic contributions to major avant-garde schools and movements such as German Expressionism, Abstraction, Surrealism, and Situationist International, as well as styles and genres specific to film, including Soviet montage, the psychodrama, the structural film, Third Cinema, and the tone-poem. Relevant social and political issues, such as feminism, Marxism, colonialism, psychoanalysis, and existentialism, will also be addressed. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with ARTH 3991 Avante-Garde Cinema and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

UNST 2991-Z (3 CR)
ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR EVERYONE

Prereq: Permission of the Instructor
This course allows students from any discipline the opportunity to explore entrepreneurship. It will allow students to pursue individual or team projects, focus on the initial phases of entrepreneurship, and emphasize personal development as a core part of the entrepreneurial journey. Students will learn to describe basic business functions, basic financial operations required to run a business, create a business model canvas, and an entrepreneurial project plan.
Note: Inquiries can be directed to careers@mta.ca

VMCS 2991-Z (3 CR)
VISUAL POP CULTURE

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course provides an interdisciplinary critical reflection on popular culture moments from the creation of the internet to the modern day. In this course, students will analyse the role websites like Vine and Tumblr played in the development of the newer generation’s visual culture, interrogate how social media apps like TikTok have affected the music industry, and explore the material culture generated via conventions and fan fiction. The course will focus on overarching themes of community and place, the transition of nerd culture from the obscure to the popular, and the impact of internet visual culture on contemporary generations. Moreover, students will discuss how popular culture has changed along with the internet and how the visuality of the internet has changed the way we communicate culturally.

VMCS 3991-Z (3 CR)
MATERIAL CULTURE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course presents an overview of the structure of social media platforms and how social media is enmeshed with material culture through different arenas of human behavior, including consumption, friendship networks, identity practices, life course rituals, political behavior, and exchange. Examples and case studies are drawn from a variety of social media platforms and both Western and non-Western cultural contexts.

VMCS 4991-Z (3 CR)
CREATIVITY IN ACTION

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course will enable students to design, under the supervision of a faculty member, their own creative, experiential learning, or research projects on a topic related to visual and/or material cultures. It will guide students through the process of exploring an original idea, researching and developing it, and producing a creative piece or a more traditional deliverable to showcase creative engagement, introspective and contextual reflection, or findings. Creativity will be at the very core of project development and students will be encouraged to engage with their topics in interesting, insightful, and informed ways.

Special topic courses — Fall 2024

ARTH 4991-A
Poetics of Space

Prereq: ARTH 2101; ARTH/MUSE 2111; 3 credits from ARTH at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This seminar is designed to critically engage with the concepts of space and perceptions about space, particularly within visual culture. Poetics of Space, is borrowed from Gaston's Bachelard's book of the same title, to explore how we perceive our world, particularly through the lens of visual art. It is about paying attention and observing the minutia of life, memory, and affect. Emphasis will be on reading, writing, and responding to visual culture and the world around us. (Exclusion: FINH 4091 Poetics of Space)

BIOC 3991-A
Research and Communication

Prereq: Third-year standing; or permission of the Department
[Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CHEM 3991 Research and Communication and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

BIOC 3991-B
Metals in Medicine

Prereq: CHEM 2311; or permission of the Department
[Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CHEM 3991 Metals in Medicine and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.] (Exclusion: CHEM 4351)

BIOL 3991-A  
Histology

Prereq: 3 credits from BIOL 2301, 2401; BIOL 2811; or permission of the instructor
This course focuses on histology and histopathology. Histology, or microscopic anatomy, is the branch of biology concerned with the composition and structure of multi-cellular plant and animal tissues in relation to their specialized functions. Histopathology is the study of abnormal cellular morphology and function and is a cornerstone of human and veterinary medicine. The course covers the evolution of metazoans, and the interplay between structure and function of cellular organizational patterns to produce organs. It aims to provide students with practical skills in microscopy, tissue staining, and independent laboratory problem solving. Through an emphasis on lab skills, students will learn to identify cellular organizations, correlate structure and function, dissect plants and animals, fix “wet” tissues and prepare it for staining, paraffin embed tissues, and section and stain the tissues. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory)
 
BIOL 3991-B
Plants and Pollinators

Prereq: BIOL 2301; or permission of the Department
This course investigates the ecological value of commercial wildflower seed mixes, applying ecological and evolutionary theory to applied questions about native versus invasive plants, supporting wild pollinators, and public engagement in conservation. The course takes an experiential approach and works in close cooperation with a community partner, requiring students to engage in a group research project and in producing work of value to the community. (Format: Integrated lecture and laboratory 3h)  

BIOL 3991-C  
Scientific Communication

Prereqs: Third-year standing; 3 credits from BIOL 1001, 1501; or permission of the Department. This course will teach upper year students in biology and related fields the fundamentals of science communication. Topics will cover ideas relating to how we perceive and construct knowledge in the biological sciences (e.g., learning theory and rhetorical studies), as well as build practical skills in public engagement (e.g., live programming and media science) and academic communications (e.g., professional scientific writing and presentations). Examples will be drawn from the biological sciences, and students will have the opportunity to tailor assignments to areas of biology that interest them. Evaluation will be based on assignments, projects, and class participation. (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 hours and Lab)

CANA 2991-A
The History of Medicine in Canada

This course provides an introduction to the history of health, illness, and care in Canada. Topics such as humoral and germ theory, epidemics, professionalization of healthcare occupations, rise of the modern hospital, public health, eugenics, and wars will be explored in-depth and demonstrate how particular historical events and movements have shaped Canadian healthcare.

CHEM 3991-A
Research and Communication

Prereq: Third-year standing; or permission of the Department
[Note 1: This course is cross-listed as BIOC 3991 Research and Communication and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

CHEM 3991-B
Metals in Medicine

Prereq: CHEM 2311; or permission of the Department
[Note 1: This course is cross-listed as BIOC 3991 Metals in Medicine and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.] (Exclusion: CHEM 4351)

CLAS 3991-A
Underworld in Greece and Rome

Prereq: 6 credits from CLAS, LATI, GREK; or Permission of the Department
This course explores Greek and Roman portrayals of the underworld and the afterlife ranging from Homer in the 8th century BC to Christian sources of the 5th century CE. It examines poetry and philosophy, art and drama, catacomb paintings and ritual practices as it seeks ancient answers to questions that continue to intrigue people today.

DRAM 2991-A
Improv Acting

Prereq: DRAM/ENGL 1701; or permission of the Department
This course explores various improvisational styles and practices. Students will learn the ways in which improvisation can benefit an actor's growth and development in both comedic and dramatic contexts and traditions.  

DRAM 3991-A
Witches in Early Modern Drama

Prereq: DRAM 1701; third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; or permission of the Program Director
This course explores witchcraft and magic in a variety of theatrical texts from the English Renaissance in conjunction with contemporaneous witchcraft and demonology pamphlets. This class will consider the position of the English professional theatre as a venue of popular entertainment, and how playwrights made use of theatrical conventions and innovations to portray learned ideas about magic, popular concerns about maleficia, gendered ideas about witchcraft, and the spectacle of magic and real-life witch trials.

DRAM 3991-P
Edinburgh Fringe

Prereq: Permission of the Instructor
This A-Term course brings students abroad to Edinburgh’s International Fringe Festival, International Film Festival, and to London, UK for experiential learning in theatre and film. Students selected for this course will see a wide range of theatre and film from across the globe and engage directly with international artists. This experience will provide students with global perspectives of the performing arts beyond what is possible in the classroom. The course will comprise an experiential research project that will be completed on the Mount Allison campus during the fall term. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as SCRN 3991 Edinburgh Fringe and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

ECON 2991-A
Food Economics

Prerequisite: Second-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course will start with a discussion of the role of grains in our socio-economics structures and will end with cake. In between we will visit grocery stores and food banks to understand how families put food on their plate, hear presentations from farmers and food producers about our agri-food industry, discuss the industrial-agricultural processes that leave many growers with out a subsistence living, and study the environmental and health impacts of our existing fast-food lifestyles. This course will be experientially or work-integrated learning based and students will expect to contribute actively towards a final project that engages our community.

ENGL 3951-A
You Are the Universe: Literature, Nature, and Self

Prerequisite: 6 credits from ENGL at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
We are all made of stardust—you, me, animals, plants, and every other living organism. How does this knowledge affect how we relate to and treat one another and the natural world? This course explores this question and others through a range of fiction, poetry, criticism, literary non-fiction, music, and film from the eighteenth century to the present.

ENGL 3991-A
Ecologies of the Book

Prerequisite: ENGL 2201; ENGL 2301; or permission of the Department
This course examines the way books are part of physical, material, and natural ecologies, starting with the earliest form of the codex book—the medieval manuscript. We will consider the evolution of the codex from earlier text forms and explore the way the physical structure of the manuscript reshaped human thought in medieval European cultures. The forms of medieval literature, including encyclopedias, bestiaries, herbals, and poetry, and the materials of the book, including parchment, illumination, and bindings, will be discussed in their relation to nature and the human body. From there, we will look at related cultural forms from the medieval era, including cosmological objects such as prayer beads, enclosed gardens, reliquaries, altar panels, stained glass, and cathedral architecture. The course will also consider the ways in which the natural world itself functioned as a text in the medieval era, participating in knowledge-making work that supported human cognition. With this thorough examination of the ecological networks of medieval books, we will extend the discussion to consider the ways in which the roots of our contemporary cultures of knowledge are also part of these ecologies, and what that might mean for living in a time of climate change. We will also discuss the physicality of books and literature: that is, how they are forms of knowledge that are intimately connected to our bodies and the ecologies we inhabit.

ENGL 4701-A
Culture of Los Angeles

Prereq: Third-year standing; permission of the Department. Preference is given to students pursuing a course-based Honours
This seminar course explores representations of Los Angeles in literature, film, and popular music, and we will critically assess various meanings imposed on the city as well as the reasons used to justify those meanings. (Exclusion: 22/FA ENGL 4701 Literature of Los Angeles)

FINA 1991-A
Drawing Explorations

This introductory course explores the application of drawing materials, techniques, and theories in a studio context. Aimed at students with an interest in drawing but not necessarily extensive experience, the course provides opportunity to develop skills related to observation; personal reflection; narrative; and image construction. The course also introduces students to the basics of studio critique and analysis of artworks. (Format: Studio 6 hours)
Note: This course is open to non-fine arts majors

FREN 3991-B
Topics in Francophone Literature II

Prereq: FREN 2601; or permission of the Department

INDG 2991-A
Residential School Legacy

Prereq: Second-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course provides an overview of similarities and differences in residential schools over time and space with a focus on commemoration initiatives that involve community, archives, libraries and museums in addition to interactive mapping of these initiatives for education and awareness. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

INDG 3991-B
Exploring Indigenous Feminisms

Prereq: Third-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course considers themes, topics and concepts related to Indigenous Feminisms, which is an emerging field with powerful voices and views about the programme and identity of Indigenous Feminisms itself. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

MUSE 4991-A
Virtual Feminist Museum

Prereq: ARTH 2101 (or FINH 2101); ARTH/MUSE 2111 (or FINH 2111); 3 credits from ARTH or MUSE at the 3000 level; or permission of the instructor
This course asks students to examine museological objects as encounters, forming new relations beyond canonical categorizations of style, period, medium and movement, while also critically analyzing museum structures. The term “virtual feminist museum” was coined by art historian Griselda Pollock to describe an encounter between a museum object and an audience that cannot be actualized. Taking inspiration from Pollock and projects like the Museum of Transgender Hirstory & Art, rather than attempting to categorize a comprehensive and universal history or seeking to merely use the language of diversity this course asks students to make their own virtual exhibition using audio, digital or experimental methods. Additionally, students will interrogate the relations between objects and observe how interpretations can influence our understanding of culture.

MUSC 3991-A
Baroque Performance Practice

Prereq: MUSC 2511; or permission of the Department
This course explores the possibilities for the historically engaged performance of music from the Baroque era (1600-1750). Looking at varied styles of instrumental and vocal music from this period, and drawing on works of diverse composers, this course applies approaches to ornamentation, vibrato, text-music relationships, tempo and meter, and tuning and temperament to culminate in a group performance project. The course will consider ideas from primary source documents and translate them into practical strategies for historically informed performance.

PHIL 4211-A
Philosophy of Bodies

Prereq: Permission of the Department
This course will explore the ways in which bodies have been included and excluded from Western philosophy. The course will cover issues such as: the perceived hierarchy between mind and body in the history of Western philosophy; the idea of normal vs. abnormal bodies; the connection between our bodies and their environment, including microorganisms; and food politics. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

PHYS 3991-A
Physics of Flight

Prereq: MATH 1151; PHYS 1551; or Permission of the Department
This course examines the physical principles involved in flight, with a particular emphasis on the practical questions facing a pilot such as the conditions for lift, stalling, aerofoil design, aircraft performance and stability during flight. Beginning from a kinetic theory of gasses and working through to the Navier-Stokes relations, this course will also introduce topics and technologies such as UAVs, computational fluid dynamics simulations, and considerations for transonic and supersonic flight.

POLS 3991-A
Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics in Comparative Perspective

Prereq: POLS 1001; 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This comparative politics course considers the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) from its beginnings in the Russian Revolution to its demise in 1991, and the 15 independent states that emerged in its wake. Beginning with a critical examination of the Soviet regime’s formal and informal institutions and political culture, it considers the causes and consequences of the Soviet collapse and compare the post-Soviet trajectories of Russia and the other Soviet successor states. The course covers Marxist-Leninist ideology, economic planning, management of ethnic and religious diversity, tools of state surveillance and repression, nationalism and ethnic conflict, secession and de-facto states, economic ‘shock therapy,’ the rise of so-called ‘oligarchs’ and clan politics, ‘colour revolutions,’ ‘competitive authoritarianism’ resurgent patriarchy and neo-traditionalism, and regional wars including Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine.

POLS 3991-B
Issues in Comparative Politics

Prereq: POLS 1001; 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department

PSYC 3991-A
Human Behaviour and Evolution

Prereq: Third-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores contemporary knowledge human psychology and behaviour, especially social behaviour, from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include foraging, cooperation, mating strategies, etc. Themes will be discussed with an interdisciplinary approach and include research by anthropologists, biologists, psychologists, and other disciplines. Students will gain experience reading and evaluating primary research articles.

PSYC 4991-A
Psychological effects of meditation

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This is an advanced course in psychology that will focus on how meditation affects the mind and brain. While meditation is documented to have been around for several millennia, this course will focus on recent scientific research on how meditation affects our thinking, feeling, attention, memory, and brain activity. Several forms of meditation and meditative techniques will be considered, and their individual effects on our psychology will be discussed. The aim of this course is to help develop a deeper understanding of the influence of meditation on our psychology, while also advancing a critical analysis of research design and interpretation.

PSYC 4991-B
Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This seminar course will examine current research related to the neurobiology of learning and memory. How do we measure learning and memory? Which regions of the brain are involved in learning and memory? What changes take place within the nervous system that allow for learning and the formation of memories? What roles do neurotransmitters, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, and epigenetic changes play?
Note: A background in biopsychology is strongly recommended

SCRN 3991-P
Edinburgh Fringe

Prereq: Permission of the Instructor
This A-Term course brings students abroad to Edinburgh’s International Fringe Festival, International Film Festival, and to London, UK for experiential learning in theatre and film. Students selected for this course will see a wide range of theatre and film from across the globe and engage directly with international artists. This experience will provide students with global perspectives of the performing arts beyond what is possible in the classroom. The course will comprise an experiential research project that will be completed on the Mount Allison campus during the fall term. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as SCRN 3991 Edinburgh Fringe and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

SCRN 4001-A
True Crime

Prereq: Third-year standing; SCRN 1001; SCRN/ENGL 2001; or permission of the Department
This course examines a range of true crime events as depicted on screen. It explores the ways in which our understandings of real-life crime are habitually filtered through the media in the form of films, TV series, docuseries, podcasts, news and social media. Through various case studies, this course explores the ‘true crime’ phenomenon through a variety of critical frameworks, including the ethics of representation; the legal system; criminal profiling; criminal psychology; historical and contemporary journalism; fan culture; social history and discrimination. By interrogating the complex relationship between true crime and popular culture, students will gain critical insights into the field of true crime.

SPAN 3991-A
Literature Against Fascism

Prereq: SPAN 3101; or permission of the Department
Writers from the Hispanic world have a long tradition of representing the socio-political problems of their time. This course attempts to provide an overview of this theme from the Spanish Civil War to the armed conflicts and dictatorships in Latin America. Delivered in Spanish.

VMCS 2991-A
Food Matters

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course explores the relationships between food and belonging. Focused especially on the study of recipes connected with contemporary East Asian communities around the globe, the class combines hands-on study with the analysis of important scholarship that helps us understand ways that food practices (including, for instance, cultivation, cooking, and storage) shape our sense of connection within social groups including families, friends, classmates, neighbours, and religious communities.

VMCS 3991-A
The Picture Book Project

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course examines children’s literature read in schools, libraries, homes, and other literacies learning contexts in our rural region. Studying these materials together with scholarship produced by experts in fields such as Disability Studies, Queer Studies, and Women and Gender studies, class members will leverage their learning about the ways picture book representations of diverse lives matter to collaboratively imagine, design, and implement an intergenerational literacies initiative with innovators in our Tantramar community.

VMCS 4991-A
The Visual Culture of Anime

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
There is an anime for everything. A human family that transforms into animals? Check. Animals that act like humans? Check. Cells in a human body that are humans? Check. But what is it that makes anime as a visual form so appealing to international audiences? This course explores the visual culture represented in and supporting anime, with specific emphasis on the portrayal of school/education themes, food culture, and romantic relationships. We will also explore anime franchises as they resurface in North American popular culture and fan media. All readings and anime will be in English or contain English subtitles. The delivery form will be seminar and students are encouraged to fully participate in guided class discussions through informed, pertinent commentary and by moderating sessions in groups.

 

Special topic courses — Winter 2025

ARTH 3991-A
Art & The Anthropocene

Prereq: ARTH 2101 (or FINH 2101); ARTH/MUSE 2111 (or FINH 2111); or permission of the Department
This course will examine the epoch of the Anthropocene through the lens of contemporary art. The Anthropocene epoch is a proposed geological age during which human activity has been the dominant influence on geological processes. Drawing together the power of representation and the understanding that matter is making us as much as we are making it, this course will examine how art functions to index, critique, mobilize, inform, and perform various issues involved with the naming and insinuated responsibility of the Anthropocene.

BIOL 3991-A
Global Change Biology

Prereq: BIOL 2101; or permission of the Department
This course will investigate concepts and issues associated with the response of organisms and ecosystems to global-scale changes in the environment. Topics covered will include changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration, global warming, changes to the nitrogen cycle, and invasive species biology.

BIOL 4991-A
Advanced Human Physiology

Prereq: BIOL 3211; or permission of the Department
This course integrates the fundamental systems of human physiology and applies them to complex human physiological questions.  Students will learn in-depth anatomy and physiology and will use problem-based learning to study the relationships between systems. Students will complete independent research on areas of clinical physiology with a focus on integrating multiple physiological systems to understand the process of homeostasis from a wholistic view.
(Format: Integrated lecture and laboratory 3h)

COMM 4991-B
International Management

Prereq: COMM 4311; or permission of the Department
This course deals with the challenges of working in international environments and managing strategic issues that arise in rapidly growing international organizations of different sizes and sectors. The course aims to help students develop an international leadership mindset while considering the specific features of local environments. The topics covered in the course may include understanding institutional contexts across the world, international business strategies, internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), organization design for international organizations, international business negotiations, and people management in international firms. The central theme of the course is adapting to the ever-increasing international diversity of organizations through fostering managerial and cultural intelligence.
(Format: Lecture/Seminar/Field project 3 Hour).

DRAM 2991-B
Playwriting And Dramaturgy

Prereq: DRAM 1701; or permission of the Department
This course will allow students to delve into the nuts and bolts of dramatic structure in order to understand what makes for a "good" play, why we tell certain stories, and how playwrights craft their work. Learning opportunities will include play analysis, creative writing, and direct engagement with professional Canadian playwrights. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as ENGL 2991 Playwriting and Dramaturgy and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

DRAM 2991-C
Shakespeare on Screen

Prereq: DRAM/ENGL 1701; or permission of the Department
This course explores how Shakespeare’s life and works have been adapted for film and television. Students will study a range of cinematic productions from the beginnings of Shakespeare on film, to classic voices such as Olivier, Branagh, and BBC television, to filmed stage productions, cross-cultural adaptations, and more recent popular adaptations of Shakespearean plots. Students will examine the plays and films in question alongside topics such as theories of adaptation, the enduring and intercultural appeal of Shakespeare’s works, and the ways in which the films reflect or subvert dominant ideas about race, class, and gender. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as SCRN 2991 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

DRAM 3991-A
Queering Performance

Prereq: DRAM 1701; third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; or permission of the Program Director
This course aims to dismantle heteronormative performance traditions and allow students to express themselves authentically and truthfully. Students will develop a strong understanding and foundation of “self” based on Queer theatre history, diverse identities, lived experiences, and other socio-cultural considerations with an emphasis on defining and expressing “Queer” identities and forms on the stage.

ENGL 2991-B
Playwriting And Dramaturgy

Prereq: ENGL 1201; or permission of the Department
This course will allow students to delve into the nuts and bolts of dramatic structure in order to understand what makes for a "good" play, why we tell certain stories, and how playwrights craft their work. Learning opportunities will include play analysis, creative writing, and direct engagement with professional Canadian playwrights. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as DRAM 2991 Playwriting and Dramaturgy and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

ENGL 4231-A
True Stories

Prereq: Third-year standing; permission of the Department. Preference is given to students pursuing a course-based Honours
This seminar will interrogate the popular “based on a true story” proclamation, examining how a handful of dynamic twenty-first century literary works represent the truth. The course will situate these works in dialogue with several topics, including the rise of autofiction, the resurgence of the historical novel, the journalistic drive for accuracy, and the challenges posed by hypermediation. The overall aim is to appreciate the literary and theoretical material in the process of gaining a deeper understanding of literature’s capacity to transmit knowledge at the present moment.

FINA 3991-A
Repeatable

Prereq: FINA 1921; FINA 1931; 12 credits from studio courses at the 2000 level; 6 credits from studio courses at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on making unique images, objects, or installations using the techniques and practices of repeatable images and objects. Participants utilize printmaking techniques and three-dimensional multiples to complete singular art projects. The course emphasizes technical exploration and critical discussion in the development of new artworks.
Experience in print media is recommended.
(Format: Studio 6 hours)

FINA 3991-B
Painting in the Expanded Field

Prereq: FINA 1921; FINA 1931; 12 credits from studio courses at the 2000 level; 6 credits from studio courses at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the idea of “Painting in the Expanded Field”, an idea that relates to the production of painting in relationship to constructed or existing three-dimensional spaces and materiality. Students experiment with colour and process-based methods, non-traditional means of painting, found materials, alternative colour sources, installation, and textile/fibre-based practices. (Format: Studio 6 hours)

FINA 3991-C
Performance: The Body

Prereq: FINA 1921; FINA 1931; 12 credits from studio courses at the 2000 level; 6 credits from studio courses at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores performance art practices, through individual and group actions in a studio context. Engaging performance art in technical, critical, and theoretical ways, the course investigates the diverse possibilities of performance art and its direct relationship to (time-based) digital technologies. Exploring performance as a distinct discipline and tool, students expand the use of performance in an intricate way, primarily using their voices, their bodies, and immediate digital platforms.  (Format: Studio 6 hours)

FINA 3991-D
Colour: Sequenced and Bound

Prereq: FINA 1921; FINA 1931; 12 credits from studio courses at the 2000 level; 6 credits from studio courses at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores the language of colour photography transitioning from gallery walls to book form. The course introduces practical strategies for generating ideas, shaping and completing a body of work, and methods of book making. The course focuses on the development of students’ technical, conceptual, and critical skills in relation to creating narrative through editing, sequencing, pairing images, and the interplay of subject and bookmaking. Experience in photography is recommended. (Format: Studio 6 hours)

FREN 3991-A
Enfances Littéraires

Prereq: FREN 2601; or permission of the Department
This course will examine literary representations of childhood among a selection of authors from the 20th and 21st centuries, with a special focus on characters encountering new cultures and languages as they grow up.

FREN 3991-B
Topics in Francophone Literature II

Prereq: FREN 2601; or permission of the Department

GENS 3991-A
Environmental Change: Forest Responses

Prereq: Third-year standing; GENS 2421; or permission of the Department
This seminar class will examine long-term change in global forests past, present and future. The objective of this course is to explore how present-day tree species have dispersed and organized into various forest communities throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) in response to a range of environmental changes. Methods of paleo-forest analysis will be investigated, that provide evidence of forest ecosystem shifts during recent millennia. Cumulative effects of human activities throughout the Anthropocene will also be investigated to assess how forests have been altered. Finally, anticipated forest response to contemporary climate changes will be estimated using published models and knowledge of past events, to forecast how future forests may be reorganized.

INDG 2991-B
Cartography and Reconciliation

Prereq: Second-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on treaty-based relationships and the residential school legacy in the context of reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. It includes relevant readings and case studies to explore the usefulness of a critical cartographic approach such as cybercartography as an umbrella for relevant work in a variety of disciplines, including history, public history, geography, archival studies, sociology, development ethics, and multidisciplinary work in Indigenous Studies (including Indigenous cartographies). (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

MUSC 3991-A
Introduction to Composition and Sound for Video Games

Prereq:  Second-year standing; Registration in the B.Mus. or B.A. Major or Minor in Music, or B.Sc. or B.A. Major in Computer Science, or Joint Major in Computer Science and Music; or permission of the Department
Working in music and sound for video games means not only composing music or designing sounds, but also creating interactive systems. This course provides students with the opportunity to create their own interactive sonic video game or sound installation using the Unity game engine.

MUSC 3991-B
Contemporary Music in Film

Prereq: Second-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course introduces students to the history of 20th and 21st century contemporary music in film. Students will become familiar with basic film music concepts, and be able to identify the primary ways in which music is used for the moving image. As well, the course provides an overview of the primary avenues in which contemporary and experimental music has been used in film, from Ligeti and Wendy Carlos in the works of Stanley Kubrick, to modern horror and the devised instruments of Mark Korven in The Witch, to the work of Hildur Guðnadóttir and Hans Zimmer in more cinematic blockbusters such as Dune. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with SCRN 3991 Contemporary Music in Film and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

MUSE 3991-A
Diversity in Museums

Prereq: ARTH 2101 (or FINH 2101); ARTH/MUSE 2111 (or FINH 2111); or permission of the Department
This course presents a series of case studies that interrogate how museums attempt to diversify the gallery walls. By examining how museums and galleries present and interpret gender, disability, race, sexuality and other marginalized voices, students will question how successful museums are at including a multiplicity of diverse people and narratives. What does a diverse museum look like? How can museums aim to not only include more diverse voices but also implement systemic changes? (Exclusion: MUSE 4991 Diversity in Museums)

POLS 4991-A
Democracy and Authoritarianism

Prereq: 3 credits from POLS 3200, 3211, 3221, 3231, 3241, 3251; or permission of the Department

PSYC 3991-A
Developing Changemakers: The Psychology of Agency in Action

Prereq: Third-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department

PSYC 4991-C
Unusual Experiences at Life's End

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the extraordinary things that can happen when someone is approaching death (e.g., dying persons seeing and interacting with deceased loved ones that no one else present can see), at the time of death (e.g., clocks and watches stopping at the exact time of a person’s death), or after death (e.g., a person sensing or feeling that a loved one who has died is present). In this course, we will compare various types of end-of-life experiences (e.g., near-death experiences, deathbed visions, terminal lucidity, after-death communications), look at current research in this area, examine possible explanations (e.g., psychological and medical theories) for these experiences, and discuss the implications of these experiences for the dying, their families, and those who work with the dying and their families.

PSYC 4991-D
Science Inquiry in Higher Education

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on topical issues within higher education. Students will explore and engage in discussions of topics including the role of academic institutes, artificial intelligence in education, scientific plagiarism, ethics, academic freedom, etc. Students will have the opportunity to develop professional skills including scientific writing, speaking, and research design.

SCRN 2991-C
Shakespeare on Screen

Prereq: DRAM/ENGL 1701; or permission of the Department
This course explores how Shakespeare’s life and works have been adapted for film and television. Students will study a range of cinematic productions from the beginnings of Shakespeare on film, to classic voices such as Olivier, Branagh, and BBC television, to filmed stage productions, cross-cultural adaptations, and more recent popular adaptations of Shakespearean plots. Students will examine the plays and films in question alongside topics such as theories of adaptation, the enduring and intercultural appeal of Shakespeare’s works, and the ways in which the films reflect or subvert dominant ideas about race, class, and gender. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as DRAM 2991 and may be taken as three credits in either discipline.]

SCRN 3991-A
Madness and Montrosity

Prereq: Third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; SCRN 1001; or permission of the Program Director
This course examines themes of ‘madness’ and ‘monstrosity’ as depicted in film, television, and the media. Students will discover the ways in which historical notions of hysteria and monstrosity, gender inequality, the patriarchy, and prejudicial medicine continue to infiltrate representations of mental illness on screen. Through frameworks such as gothic feminism, the medical humanities, social (in)justice, neurodiversity, and the concept of the ‘other’, this course interrogates both historical and contemporary notions of mental illness, neurodiversity, gender and cultural norms through the lens of screen media.

SCRN 3991-B
Contemporary Music in Film

Prereq: Third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; SCRN 1001; or permission of the Program Director
This course introduces students to the history of 20th and 21st century contemporary music in film. Students will become familiar with basic film music concepts, and be able to identify the primary ways in which music is used for the moving image. As well, the course provides an overview of the primary avenues in which contemporary and experimental music has been used in film, from Ligeti and Wendy Carlos in the works of Stanley Kubrick, to modern horror and the devised instruments of Mark Korven in The Witch, to the work of Hildur Guðnadóttir and Hans Zimmer in more cinematic blockbusters such as Dune. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with MUSC 3991 Contemporary Music in Film and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

VMCS 2991-B
Introduction to Anime

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course is an introduction to a critical approach to anime as a form of media, industry, and a cultural artefact. We will build upon our individual understandings of the Japanese style of animated film through discovery of a history of the medium and its place in Japan’s society. Importantly, we will also consider the transnational and transcultural dimensions of anime as a global form of media. Anime has had a strong impact on worldwide audiences, and we will take some time to better understand and explore the positionality of global fans and Japanese otaku alike. This course involves a critical understanding of anime as form and object, but it does not include instruction in the creation of anime or manga.

VMCS 3991-A
Happiness and Culture

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course considers how diverse object shape the ways humans think about and pursue happiness. In this course we will work with a range of material culture (including board games, toys, puzzles, trading cards, and pop-up books), exploring if and how an object-based approach can enrich our understandings and experiences of happiness.

VMCS 3991-B
Professional Development

Prereq: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to build their professional profile and sharpen their visual and material literacy, intercultural communication skills, social media engagement, cultural heritage understanding, and project management essentials. Through class presentations and hands-on, customised workshops, students will receive practical training that is key in today’s global economy and digital age. The course has a weekly unscheduled complement that will expose students to career opportunities and postgraduate study/volunteer options.

WGST 2991-A
Reproductive Justice

This course introduces the key tenets of reproductive justice with a focus on contemporary movements for bodily autonomy. Rooted in Black feminist praxis, reproductive justice incorporates an intersectional approach to sexual health and well-being with a focus on political action. This course will outline the historical development of reproductive justice, highlight key social movements and organizations, and consider contemporary struggles for trans rights, parenting, birth care, and abortion care within a reproductive justice framework.

WGST 2991-B
Feminism Beyond Borders

Prereq: Second-year standing; or WGST 1001; or permission of the Program Director
This course explores transnational feminist praxis with, within, and beyond the institution of the modern nation-state. Course materials draw from the rich history of anti-racist, anticolonial, and anti-imperial feminist theory and practice. Specific course topics vary from year to year, but include: transnational surrogacy, sex work, migrant labour, care work, prisons, mining, tourism, climate action, war, militarization, and more. Course materials include scholarly texts as well as videos, blog posts, visual and performance art, and materials produced by and for transnational feminist activism. (Format: Lecture/Discussion)

Courses with placement tests

Before you can register for certain courses, you may need to complete a placement test. Most placements tests can be found in Moodle > Placement tests.

French placement tests

If you would like to take a French course, and have not already done so at Mount Allison, you must complete the French placement test to help us place you in the appropriate course. You will not be able to register for a French course until you receive written permission from the department.

The French placement test is available on Moodle > Placement tests.

If you experience any difficulties logging into Moodle please email helpdesk@mta.ca or phone (506) 364-2473.

Once your test has been assessed you will receive an e-mail notifying you of course placement.

To register for your French course(s), send an e-mail to reghelp@mta.ca indicating clearly the section of the course you wish to register for. The registration helpdesk personnel will verify your name against the French placement list and register you in the appropriate course and section.

Should you have any questions or comments about the assessment, please feel free to contact the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at mll@mta.ca.

German and Spanish placement tests

If you have experience with the Spanish or German languages and don’t believe the introductory courses would be appropriate to your skill level, you may write the placement assessments.

Placement tests are available in Moodle > Placement tests.

Math assessment test for calculus

For students wanting to register for  MATH 1151.

The Math Assessment Test is used to determine your present mathematics ability.

Any student may proceed to register for MATH 1151 but will have to write the assessment test in person during the first week of classes, during the scheduled Lab time. Students are required to pass the Math Assessment Test in order to remain registered in MATH 1151.

If you don’t pass the test, you may take Functions (Math 1011) instead of calculus in the fall term (you can then proceed with MATH 1151 in the winter term).

To help prepare for the test:

The Department has prepared a practice test and free online self-guided course. Both of these, as well as more information about the test, are available on the Math Assessment Test Moodle page.

Course exclusions

What does it mean if there is an exclusion list found in a course description?

If you've already taken a course listed in the exclusion list found in a course description, you won't be able to count the credits from that course towards your degree.

What are course exclusions?

Exclusions are listed because some courses cover similar material. Students should not earn credit for taking two courses which are quite similar. However, the exclusion does not imply that the courses are interchangeable. Programs often require a specific course selection.

The exclusion means that the course you want to take has significant overlap with the course you have already taken (or are currently taking) and therefore you may not take both courses for credit towards your degree. If you do take both courses you will only be able to use credits from one of the courses taken, not both, towards your degree requirements.

Students should seek academic advising in all cases by emailing advisor@mta.ca.

Connect will not prevent you from enrolling in a course that is an exclusion with one you have already taken, or are currently taking. Also, your transcript will not indicate if an excluded course is completed.

Course exclusions for 2024-24 (pdf):

  • Coming soon

Questions? Contact the Registrar's Office at regoffice@mta.ca or call (506) 364-2269.