Choose your courses and plan your schedule | Mount Allison

Choose your courses and plan your schedule for the upcoming academic year. You can also find out more about special courses.

Once you know the course requirements for your program, you can plan what classes you're going to take in the upcoming academic year.

Not sure what courses you need? Visit advising and degree planning.


    Select your courses

    To see courses being offered in the upcoming or current academic year, use our course timetables:

    Courses and descriptions are also available in Self-Service.

    When making your course selections, please ensure you meet all course prerequisites and co-requisites (e.g. labs/tutorials).

    Course load information

    Normal course load

    Full-time students are expected to register for the equivalent of 30 credits in the Fall and Winter terms, normally 15 credits per term. 

    Most courses are 3-credit courses offered in one term. Refer to Academic Calendar 11.0 Course Numbering and Credit Values

    If you intend to carry a normal course load you should register for 10 courses in total - five courses (15 credits) in the fall term, and five courses (15 credits) in the winter term. 

    Every degree program requires completion of 120 credits in total:

    15 credits per term X 2 terms = 30 credits per year
    30 credits per year X 4 years = 120 credits

    Nine credits per term is the minimum course load required to be considered a full-time student. Registration in three to six credits per term is considered part-time enrollment. 

    Keep in mind, in addition to the regular class (lecture), a number of courses also involve a mandatory lab or tutorial component. Labs/tutorials do not count as separate courses or credits in your registration. 

    Reduced course load

    Here are some things to consider as you determine the number of courses you will take in a term:

    • If you have a University scholarship you are most likely required to enroll in 15 credits per term (Fall and Winter) in order to meet criteria for renewal in the following year. This is the case even if you enter with transfer credits / advanced standing.
    • Other types of funding agencies normally have a course load requirement (e.g. Government Student Loans). Check directly with your funding agency if you have questions about this.
    • There is a course load requirement to qualify for Dean's List standing.
    • International students considering a part-time load should consult with the International Student Advisor (intadvisor@mta.ca) to discuss immigration implications.
    • International students who speak English as an additional language may wish to consult with the International Student Advisor (intadvisor@mta.ca) to discuss course load recommendations.
    • Students with disabilities may wish to consult with the Meighen Centre for a course load recommendation.
    • Taking fewer courses may help to reduce stress, maintain or improve mental health, and ease the transition to university. It can also allow more study time for each course to improve grades.
    • Consider other commitments you may have such as co-curricular involvement, volunteer or paid work, or family commitments. Varsity athletes sometimes take a reduced course load in season.
    • Think about what makes sense for you and find a balance that works. Everybody has a different learning experience, and you have options. Plan for what will meet your needs.
    • Keep in mind, if you take less than 15 credits per term plan how you will 'make up' for the missed credits (spring/summer courses, overloading, returning for an additional year of study).

    Questions? Email advisor@mta.ca.

    Course overload

    The permission of the appropriate Academic Dean is required for registration above 18 credits per term. To access the permission request form, go through Connect.

    • Students with first-year standing are not permitted to register for more than 15 credits per term. Under exceptional circumstances first-year students may be permitted to overload in the Winter term if they achieve a TGPA of at least 3.5 in the Fall term.
    • Students with second- or third-year standing who are in Good Standing may register for up to 18 credits per term, provided they have attained a TGPA of at least 2.0 in the previous Fall or Winter term. Students in Good Standing who do not meet this requirement must have permission from the appropriate Academic Dean in order to register for overload credits.
    • Students with fourth-year standing who are in Good Standing may register for up to 18 credits per term. Students who are not in Good Standing must have permission from the appropriate Academic Dean in order to register for overload credits.

    Questions? Email regoffice@mta.ca.

      Plan your schedule

      To help plan your courses before your register, you can use a blank timetable template to make sure your courses fit in your schedule. You can also include backup courses in this worksheet in case the courses you want to take are full.

      Ready to register for courses? Visit course registration.


      About courses

      Course delivery formats

      The course delivery format for each individual course is clearly indicated on the Timetable and in Self-Service. Please check each course component carefully — lectures and labs/tutorials for a single course may be delivered in different formats.

      • Sackville: Students are expected to be on campus and participate on the day and time listed on the timetable.
      • Scheduled, online only: Students are not required to be on campus but are expected to participate on the day and time listed on the timetable.
      • Unscheduled, online only: Students are not required to be on campus and there are no scheduled meeting times.

      A-Term courses

      The A-Term is a two-week intensive course period at the beginning of the fall term (normally the last two weeks of August). During this session, students may complete an entire 3-credit course or an intensive portion of a fall term course that continues through to December.

      A-Term FAQ

      What is the A-Term?
      The A-Term is a two-week intensive course period at the beginning of the fall term (normally the last two weeks of August). During this session, students may complete an entire 3-credit course or an intensive portion of a fall term course that continues through to December.

      Are A-Term courses part of the spring/summer term or the fall term?
      A-Term courses are part of the fall term.

      Are additional tuition and fees charged for A-Term courses?
      Tuition for A-Term courses are factored into fall term fees. Some A-Term courses may incur additional fees and expenses (travel, accommodations, etc.)

      How many A-Term courses can I register for?
      You can register for a maximum of one 3-credit A-Term course each academic year.

      What is the registration deadline for A-Term courses?
      The registration deadline for 2022 A-Term courses is midnight on August 21. Late registrations will not be considered.

      What is the withdrawal deadline for A-Term courses?
      Students registered for an A-Term designated course may withdraw without academic penalty before the end of the first week of the A-Term session.

      Do I have to participate in the A-Term?
      No, registration in an A-Term course is optional. You will not have to complete an A-Term course to satisfy mandatory degree or program requirements.

      If I take one A-Term course, and 6 credits in the fall term, will I still be considered full-time?
      No, in addition to an A-Term course you must be registered for at least 9 credits in the regular fall term to be considered a full-time student.

      If I take an A-Term course, do I still have to register for 15 credits in the fall term to have a full course load?
      No. Your A-Term course counts towards your fall registration. If you register for an additional 12 credits in the fall term, this will be considered a full course load.

      How will an A-Term course impact my course load requirements for scholarship renewal? If I meet all other criteria, will I still be eligible for renewal if I take one A-Term course as part of my required course load?
      Yes, an A-Term course counts as 3-credits in your fall registration towards your course load requirements for scholarship renewal.  

      I am not eligible to overload. Can I still take one A-Term course and 15 credits in the fall term without special permission?
      No, this would require approval of a Dean. Registration in an A-Term course, and 12 additional credits in the Fall term would be considered a full course load.

      How will taking an A-Term course affect my eligibility as a varsity athlete?
      You should discuss this with your coach and the Athletics staff. The course would be registered as a fall term course, but your practice schedule may impact your ability to participate in the A-Term.

      I am an international student. If I take one A-Term course, and 6 credits in the fall term, will I still be considered a full-time student for immigration purposes? How many hours can I work off-campus if I take one A-Term course, and 6 credits in the fall term?
      Yes, international students registered in 3-credits in the A-Term and 6 credits in the regular fall term will be considered full-time for immigration purposes, and reporting to IRCC. In this case, international students are still limited to working 20 hours per week off-campus.

      How will registration in an A-Term course appear on my academic transcript?
      An A-Term course will appear as a fall term course on your transcript and will not be distinguishable from regular fall term registrations.

      When are grades available for A-term courses?
      Grades will be available at the end of the fall term.

      How will I know if a course is scheduled for the A-Term?
      A-Term courses will be designated by the specific section codes P and Q (e.g. SUBJ-X991-P) on the timetable and in the course registration system. We will also publish an annual list of A-Term course offerings.

      Do all A-Term courses require me to be on campus?
      Not necessarily. Because there are no other course conflicts, this session allows for courses to happen anywhere. Some courses may involve travel or learning experiences away from campus.

      Will any A-Term courses be offered in an unscheduled online-only format?
      A-Term courses can be offered in any format.

      A-Term courses - Fall 2022

      CENL/INDG 1991 - P (3 CR)
      INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY ASSETS

      Prereqs: Permission of the instructor
      This course functions as an extension of civic life. Learners will explore Asset Based Community Development principles and practices and how their application contributes to flourishing communities. This course aims to shift how students understand themselves as learners and requires them to step out of their comfort zone and into discovery!  

      Schedule: August 22 to 26. Daily from 9:00am-4:15pm.

      Delivery Method: Hybrid model. Students are located on communities (Esgenoopetitj, Elsipogtog or Neqotkuk) for the duration of the week. If a student wishes to take the course but cannot travel to the community for instruction, they have a virtual option.

      CENL 2991 - P (3 CR)
      RURAL AND SMALL TOWN PLACES

      This course examines the unique social, political and economic structures of rural and small town communities and recent challenges to their viability within the rapidly urbanizing Canadian context. The course is designed to introduce students to the unique set of issues, opportunities, challenges and linkages that make up the thousands of rural and small-town communities that are spread across the country. This intensive A-Term course will focus on the nature of rural and small town communities through a place-based approach, applying emerging community development concepts through the living laboratory that surrounds us here in Sackville and the Maritime region. In particular, students will focus on recent changes to the nature of communities through municipal reform and community amalgamation to evaluate the resiliency of these places and measuring them against the social science literature on community development and the nature of rurality.  

      Schedule: August 29 to September 2. Daily from 9:00am-5:30pm.

      Delivery Method: Much of the class time will require the group to travel and experience a number of small town and rural communities in the Maritimes, thus there is  a class limit of 18 students. When on campus, we will work in the Learning Lab, Hart Hall Room 115. This is an intensive course, with significant background readings and preparation outside of class time, as well as daily development of a personal learning portfolio as the basis of student evaluation. All evaluation will be completed in the scheduled course delivery period. Transportation will be provided for course participants.

      GENS 3991 - P (3 CR)
      SKY EYES: READING LANDSCAPES

      Prereqs: GENS 1401; GENS 2441
      The purpose of this course is to learn tools and techniques for identifying and interpreting landforms and landscapes. Remotely sensed data (e.g., satellite imagery) will be analyzed using one or more image processing software packages. The goals include being able to identify and characterize various landforms (e.g., estimate size) and being able to identify potential natural hazards (e.g., likelihood of a slope failure). Students who complete the course should be able to assess and solve actual challenges related to human interactions with landscapes, such as picking a landing site for an aircraft, picking a route for a hiking trail, avoiding a hazard area, etc.

      Schedule: August 22 to September 2. Daily in AVDX 115 from 9:00am-12:00pm & 1:00pm-4:00pm (6 hrs/day). Final projects are due September 23.

      SOSC 4991 - P (3 CR)
      PEOPLE SKILLS FOR LEADERS

      People Skills for Leaders is a highly applied experiential course. In each class you will be applying learning from readings about interactive people skills and about relationship-based transformational leadership. Then, based on your application, you will be writing reflectively and personally about your actual experience of people skills and about the development of your leadership using people skills, with all its triumphs and its messiness.  You will also be required to be a member of a team which will meet daily and do exercises between August 24th and September 1st and must make a formal presentation for marks on September 2nd.

      Schedule: from 9:00am to 12:30pm August 22-31 and September 1-2. Final reflective assignment due November 4th.

      Delivery method and expectations: SOSC 4991 is a scheduled on-campus course. All students are expected to come to all 3 ½ hours of each of the ten classes unless absence is excused. Students must also be involved in all experiential activities, must lead at least one team exercise/activity and must actively engage in reflective thinking and reading before and after each class.  Consistent with the block system in other places, it is recommended that you limit outside activities during the two-week immersion experience.

       

      Courses without prerequisites

      Any student may register for a course without prerequisites. First-year students, keep in mind that there may be additional winter term courses available to you if you fill a prerequisite in the fall.

      What is a prerequisite course?

      A prerequisite course is one that must be successfully completed before you begin a second course.

      You may register for courses that have prerequisites in the winter term provided that you are registered for the prerequisite course in the fall (or have successfully completed it in a previous term).

      A grade of C- or better must be obtained in order to use a course to fill a prerequisite.

      List of courses without prerequisites

      Special topic courses

      Special topic courses either focus on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department of program, or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program.

      Special topic courses — Spring/Summer 2022

      CANA 1991 - Z (3 CR)
      SPORT AND LEISURE IN CANADA

      This course explores the history and contemporary contexts of sport and leisure activities across Canada with attention to intersecting identities (including such dimensions as racialization, gender, age, disability, and class) and through a variety of images, objects, documents, videos, and media snippets. The course allows students to examine what media coverage of and participation in different sports reflect about life in Canada, as well as asks students to think about what the decisions we make about the recreational activities we pursue reveal about Canadian cultures and communities. Themes include: the rise of organized sports; representations and the politics of sport and leisure; nationalisms; health, bodies, and physical education; the environment and nature tourism; and cultures of (rural and urban) amusement (Format: Unscheduled Online Only). 

      FINH 3991 - Z (3 CR)
      FILM NOIR

      Prereqs: FINH 2101; FINH 2111; or permission of the Department
      This course examines the cinematic genre of film noir. It will consider films ranging from the genre's classic cycle of the 1940s and 50s to the “neo-noir” revival of the 1970s and beyond. Topics will include noir's literary roots in hard-boiled detective fiction, its cinematic and aesthetic antecedents in German Expressionism, its social and political preoccupations, and its pervasive and enduring legacy in art and media. Questions about genre, visual style, narrative form, sexuality, gender, and race will inform readings and discussions. Close textual analysis of individual films will be supplemented with critical, theoretical, and historical readings. (Format: Lecture, Scheduled Online Only).

      GENS 3991 - Z (3 CR)
      GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

      Prereqs: Third-year standing; GENS 1401; or permission of the Department
      This course will examine the major global changes influencing earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere (including cryosphere), lithosphere, and biosphere. Lectures will investigate the causes and impacts of a variety of global change issues, including potential solutions. Tutorial/laboratory sessions will explore how scientific information about global change are communicated across diverse platforms to stakeholders. By the end of the course students will have 1) developed an appreciation for global change impacting earth systems, 2) critically examined strategies used to disseminate scientific information, and 3) learned diverse tools to communicate global change issues effectively (Format: Lecture/Tutorial, Scheduled Online Only).

      PSYC 2991 - Z (3 CR)
      CROSS-CULTURAL SEXUALITY

      This course is an overview of sexuality and sex education from a cross-cultural perspective. The focus will be on social and cultural influences on sexuality. There is a specific focus on comparing the Netherlands and Canada, but we will also explore perspectives in other countries. This class will take place in Utrecht, Netherlands. 

      RELG 2991 - Z (3 CR)
      GENDER, COLONIALISM, AND RELIGION

      Gender, Colonialism and Religion explores the interconnectedness of colonialism and religion(s), and their mutual influence on how categories such as sex, gender, and sexuality are expressed and understood both locally and globally. This course covers the entanglements between “Church” and “State” in precolonial and colonial Europe, and how these relationships influenced gender regulation at the advent of settler colonialism. This course further explores temporary and historical expressions of gender, sex, and sexuality that exist outside of and defy settler colonial logics. Topics include intersectional analyses of (anti)colonial gender configurations in North America and globally; critical analyses of contemporary gender discourse and its relationships to neocolonialism; and histories of religion(s) as tools of restriction as well as liberation (Format: Lecture, Scheduled Online Only). 

      SCIE 1991 - Z (3 CR)
      ECO-CULTURAL APPROACHES TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

      This course introduces students to the study of ecosystems and various approaches to environmental science (from the Latin scientia, meaning ‘knowing’). Going beyond dominant Western or European views, SCIE 1991’s methods and approaches to the natural world to include Indigenous and other ways of knowing the earth’s ecological systems, biosphere dynamics and the importance of biodiversity and sustainability. The Eco-Cultural Approach embodies the beliefs and understandings of non-Western people, acquired through long-term connections to place, and a culturally-dependent perception of the natural environment, shaped by local and Indigenous science (Format: Unscheduled Online Only).

      VMCS 2991 - Z (3 CR)
      INTRODUCTION TO INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

      This course adopts an approach grounded in cultural studies to introduce students to key theories, concepts, and issues in intercultural communication, which is defined as the transmission and reception of verbal and non-verbal messages across languages and cultures. It sheds light on how cultural differences and variables impact communication, reveals the common barriers to intercultural exchange, and reflects on identity and otherness, cultural filters and templates, and the relationship between culture, media, and language. Examples are drawn from textual, visual, and material cultures of the past, as well as contemporary mass media contexts. By playing the role of cultural mediators, students will learn how to deconstruct cultural templates and frames of reference, analyse past and present intercultural encounters and conflict, and interpret standards and values as embedded in various contexts of expression (pictures, advertisements, texts, films, etc.) (Format: Unscheduled Online Only).

      Special topic courses — Fall 2022

      ARTH 3991 - A (3 CR)
      QUEER ART HISTORIES

      Prereq: ARTH 2101 (or FINH 2101); ARTH/MUSE 2111 (or FINH 2111); or permission of the Department
      As many curators, historians and artists are re-evaluating and considering a wider breadth of sexualities, it has become more crucial to consider how queer art and artists are discussed and represented in art histories. By examining several themes, such as “the closet”, homoeroticism and camp, this course not only asks students to think about what is considered queer art, but to reflect on queer art and artists of the past and present.

      ARTS 1991- A (3 CR)
      THINKING THROUGH THE ARTS: CRITICAL AND CREATIVE PRACTICE

      This course explores questions such as: how do poetry, language, art, music, and other creative practices help us think and to understand the world around us; how creative and critical thinking help us build our intellectual capacity and form our learning skills. The course primarily engages literature and literary questions, connecting literary practices to other creative and critical practices in Arts disciplines. It builds competencies and skills that transfer to studies across disciplines and that support life beyond university. The readings combine literary texts in English with texts from other disciplines, as well as materials from other media such as music, fine art, digital media, and performance. Discussions engage a broad range of topics including: personal ethics and the scholarly community; social and cultural engagement; and the relationship between intellectual life and the material/natural world. This course also aims to instill good work habits, study skills, and work-life balance so that students can achieve their goals in university. It develops higher-order thinking skills such as active reading practice, oral and written self-expression, memorization and other information management skills, collaboration, creative engagement in a range of media, and critical thinking skills. [Note: This course is recommended for first year students] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

      CANA 1991 - A (3 CR)
      CITIZENSHIP AND DIVERSITY IN CANADA

      Limited: First year students only
      This course is a limited enrolment experimental course intended for first year students. It looks at the meaning and importance of citizenship in contemporary Canada. It is intended to provide foundational instruction that enhances student learning capacity. Some of the topics it will address include citizenship and identity, rights, the media and digital citizenship, political alienation and public life, reconciliation and First Peoples, and inequality.

      CENL 1991 - A (3 CR)
      COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL CHANGE

      This course explores the history and contemporary realities of the concept of social change. It helps students to understand the systemic conditions that are at the heart of the many challenges with which communities contend. Through a series of inter-disciplinary case studies, students will examine such issues such as race, climate change, media literacy, housing insecurity, educational reform, and community sustainability. The course presents these conceptual tools as preparation for community organizing and volunteer work.

      CENL 3991 - A (3 CR)
      RELIGION, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY

      Prereq: 6 credits from RELG; or permission of the Department
      This course explores the many complex connections between contemporary identity, relationship and community. Drawing on the wealth of religious thought and tradition, it considers central questions such as what makes a healthy community? How does individual identity relate to community identity? What freedoms, expectations and obligations does living in community bring? And ultimately, to what extent can religion continue to provide guidance in a contemporary secular society? Topics investigate notions of identity alongside such issues as postcolonialism, ecology, nostalgia, ableism, and social mobilization. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as RELG 3991 Religion, Community, Identity and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

      CLAS 3991 - A (3 CR)
      MARGINALIZED CULTURES IN ANTIQUITY

      Prereq: 6 credits from CLAS, LATI, GREK; or permission of the Department
      This course looks beyond ancient Greece and Rome, providing an in-depth examination of several cultures and peoples traditionally marginalized in both ancient and modern historical narratives. Topics include, but are not limited to, Persia, Carthage, Judea, Celtic and Germanic peoples, non-Roman Italy, and Egypt. Each topic will be approach in two ways. First, we will consider how we can use the few genuine sources which survive to reconstruct the history of these peoples. With this background knowledge, we will then critically analyze how Greco-Roman sources depicted each culture in turn. Along the way, we will consider larger issues of ancient cultural hegemonies, epistemicide, imperialism, and colonialism and how they impact modern views of the ancient past. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as HIST 3991 Marginalized Cultures in Antiquity and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

      COMP 3991 - A (3 CR)
      PRINCIPLES OF OBJECT-ORIENTED DESIGN

      Prereq: COMP 2631; or permission of the Department
      The fundamental principles of object-oriented design include transforming descriptive analysis models into computation models for implementation. This course provides a deeper understanding of object-oriented design using graphical design notations such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and object-oriented design patterns. In addition, the course emphasizes testing, specifically unit testing of components. Object-oriented solutions will be designed using UML class diagrams and implemented in a high-level language (Java).

      DRAM 3991 - A (3 CR)
      COMMEDIA DELL'ARTE

      Prereq: DRAM 1701; Third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; or permission of the Program Director
      This course introduces students to the performance style and historical contexts of Commedia dell’arte while analyzing its place in theatre across different social and cultural histories up to, and including, the 21st century. The course will also explore how the style of theatrical comedy functions within film and television.

      DRAM 3991 - B (3 CR)
      MENTAL HEALTH ON SCREEN

      Prereq: DRAM 1701; Third-year standing in the Interdisciplinary Drama Program; or permission of the Program Director
      Mental Health on Screen introduces students to the various representations of mental health and related contexts in film, television, and popular culture media across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It will examine how historical and contemporary medicine, psychology, psychiatry, society and culture have defined mental health, its stigmas, management, treatment and impacts, and explore how filmmakers, writers, and artists have portrayed such ideas across a variety of screen and popular media.

      ECON 4991 - A (3 CR)
      BUSINESS CYCLES

      Prereq: ECON 2111; or permission of the Department
      This course familiarizes students with business cycle “stylized facts” and two workhorse models used in macroeconomics which attempt to explain economic fluctuations: the Real Business Cycle (RBC) model and the New Keynesian (NK) model. These models are also used by macroeconomists to study inflation dynamics and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies. Students will be introduced to solution methods used for solving the RBC and NK models and apply these methods using MATLAB software. The course is designed to prepare upper-year students who are continuing on to pursue graduate studies in economics.

      ENGL 1991 - A (3 CR)
      INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING

      This course will immerse us in the social world of creative study as we learn to be disciplined and imaginative readers and writers. Our readings, discussions, exercises, and guest artists will shed light on major facets of literary craft, including its methods and its practice, its genres and their exemplars. We will develop lasting critical/creative competencies and connections, as the messy and mysterious phenomenon of creativity comes alive through our collective study.

      ENGL 2991 - A (3 CR)
      CRIME FICTION

      Prereq: ENGL 1201; or permission of the Department
      This course examines crime fiction that spans multiple genres and traditions. We will begin by tracing the canonical arc of the genre, from nineteenth-century detective fiction to hardboiled and Golden Age crime fiction. Equipped with knowledge of the mechanisms and conventions of crime fiction, we will devote the second half of the semester to contemporary crime narratives that expose deeper rooted histories and pathologies such as colonialism, racism, misogyny, and heteronormativity. At least two overarching questions will structure our engagement with the material: (How) does crime fiction solicit our revulsion and complicity as readers? What kind/s of critical consciousness of justice or injustice is/are cultivated through modern crime fiction?

      ENGL 3991 - A (3 CR)
      INTRO TO E-PUBLISHING

      A 21st century digital economy has become so all-pervasive that a grounding in the basics of online content generation as a sub-set of digital humanities knowledge is necessary for re-energizing the arts. While this introductory course focuses on the editorial and literary publishing aspects of online content generation, it also discusses general principles in the production of genre-specific online content (such as blogposts and marketing copy) and their appropriate formats, deploying Canadian style. In that regard attention will be given to the Canadian govt content-generation requirements for its E-government website – <Canada.ca> and its emphasis on plain language and the conversion of [sample] scientific content into plain non-jargonistic language.  While this is not a web design course, a basic understanding of website architecture is necessary for online content formatting. Similarly, the course will incorporate basic html coding to facilitate Website backend content loading and editing on a WordPress content management system. This course covers: Literary publishing on the web; Web writing principles; Editing with Content Management Systems; Writing for Social Media Marketing (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram etc.); Writing for e-government (Canada.ca); Interfacing book publishing with digital tools (Publish on Demand - Espresso Book Machine); Digital Shopfloor management/ Digital vis-à-vis Book Publishing process; HTML/ Coding (for back-end WordPress editing).

      ENGL 4991 - A (3 CR)
      SPORTS AND LITERARY PRACTICE

      Prereq: Permission of the instructor. Interested students should email Dr. Rogers (jrogers@mta.ca) explaining their interest in the course. Please include a brief description of what your athletic practice might be during the term. Priority will be given to advanced Majors and Minors in English.
      This senior English seminar will explore the intersections between sports, athletics, and literature through the frame of practice: that is, deliberate, structured, and repeated engagement in athletic and literary activity. The practice approach to literature involves an intensified consideration of the work of reading, thinking and writing. We will undertake reading and writing activities in and outside of class on a weekly basis, with the subject of sports and athletics as our focus. Working with sports and athletes as our primary topic allows us to access certain key aspects of literary practice, especially mind-body connections in reading, writing, and literary interpretation. It allows us to consider the physical and material nature of language and literary constructs. Conversely, looking at sports and athletics through literature and literary considerations centres the artistic formations of sports and the aesthetic experiences of athletics. Woven through both sides of this joining of literature and sports are important conversations about ethics, politics, and culture. Students are expected to commit to a weekly reading/writing practice and an athletic practice for the duration of the term.

      HIST 3991 - A (3 CR)
      MARGINALIZED CULTURES IN ANTIQUITY

      Prereq: Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course looks beyond ancient Greece and Rome, providing an in-depth examination of several cultures and peoples traditionally marginalized in both ancient and modern historical narratives. Topics include, but are not limited to, Persia, Carthage, Judea, Celtic and Germanic peoples, non-Roman Italy, and Egypt. Each topic will be approach in two ways. First, we will consider how we can use the few genuine sources which survive to reconstruct the history of these peoples. With this background knowledge, we will then critically analyze how Greco-Roman sources depicted each culture in turn. Along the way, we will consider larger issues of ancient cultural hegemonies, epistemicide, imperialism, and colonialism and how they impact modern views of the ancient past. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 3991 Marginalized Cultures in Antiquity and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

      HIST 4991 - A (3 CR)
      THE HISTORY OF IGNORANCE

      Prereq: Permission of the instructor
      This seminar examines the history of ignorance as something that is made and maintained as opposed to simply a lack of knowledge. The focus is on modern and recent history, and will include topics such as climate change denial, the history of advertising, and the roles of race, gender, and politics in making knowledge.

      INDG 2991- A (3 CR)
      INDIGENOUS DRUMMING

      Prereq: INDG 1001; or permission of the instructor
      Indigenous drumming music provides an important sonic element to Indigenous celebrations, many that include dancing and singing, and honour Indigenous ancestral traditions. This course provides practical drumming instruction and considers the historical background and societal and ceremonial contexts of Indigenous drumming. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as MUSC 2991 Indigenous Drumming and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

      INLR 3991 - C (3 CR)
      THE COLD WAR

      Prereqs: INLR/POLS 2301; or permission of the Department
      The Cold War was, and remains, a rich case for the study of bipolar distributions of power under anarchy. As we contemplate a potential return to bipolarity, and revisit US-Russia rivalry in the context of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, this reading-intensive course will consider various international relations perspectives on the Cold War international order. We will examine competing ideological convictions, evolving nuclear strategy, alliance formation, dissolution and resistance, and crisis behaviour, and consider critical perspectives and subaltern voices alongside more mainstream approaches. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as POLS 3991 The Cold War and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline. Note 2: This course counts as an International Politics course in the 33/43 series.]

      MUSC 2991- A (3 CR)
      INDIGENOUS DRUMMING

      Prereq: INDG 1001; or permission of the instructor
      Indigenous drumming music provides an important sonic element to Indigenous celebrations, many that include dancing and singing, and honour Indigenous ancestral traditions. This course provides practical drumming instruction and considers the historical background and societal and ceremonial contexts of Indigenous drumming. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as INDG 2991 Indigenous Drumming and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

      MUSC 3991 - A (3 CR)
      METER AND TIMING ACROSS CULTURES

      Prereq: MUSC 2703; or permission of the Department
      This course explores aspects of meter and timing in recorded music from around the world. Topics include issues in meter perception, cross-cultural analysis, and performance analysis. Case studies include Romantic piano music, African dance music, and sacred chant from three Silk Road cultures. Assignments provide experience in computer-assisted transcription and in the design of analytical figures. Final projects may center on any style of recorded music, from anywhere in the world, and may include performance and/or multimedia elements.

      PHIL 3991 - A (3 CR)
      INDO-HELLENIC PHILOSOPHY

      Prereq: 3 credits from PHIL; 3 credits from PHIL at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course looks back at the possible influence of an encounter with Indian philosophical thought on the Greek skeptic Pyrrho’s ideas (when he travelled to the subcontinent with Alexander the Great), and then forward on how these ideas in turn are formative of the Hellenistic tradition (of Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics). Specifically, we look at the texts from the early Indian tradition that involve a dialogue amongst Hindu, Buddhist, Jaina and Charvaka (hedonist) schools, before we turn our attention to Pyrrho and the Hellenistic thinkers. We will discuss metaphysical, epistemological, ethical and soteriological themes on the nature of reality, knowledge, skepticism, right action and freedom. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

      PHYS 3991 - A (3 CR)
      THE PHYSICS OF FLIGHT

      Prereqs: PHYS 1551; 3 credits from MATH 1111, 1151; or permission of the Department
      This course examines the physical principles involved in flight, with a particular emphasis on the practical questions facing a pilot such as the conditions for lift, stalling, aerofoil design, aircraft performance and stability during flight.  Beginning from a kinetic theory of gasses and working through to the Navier-Stokes relations, this course will also introduce topics and technologies such as UAVs, computational fluid dynamics simulations, and considerations for transonic and supersonic flight.

      POLS 3991 - A (3 CR)
      POLITICAL VIOLENCE: CATEGORIES OF VIOLENCE, ACTORS, & RESPONSES

      Prereqs: POLS 1001; 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course examines political violence, and the strategies to counter its legacies. It raises and answers a set of questions: What is political violence? What are the mechanisms driving political violence? Why does it take place? What are the causes of civil wars and rebellions? What makes states or non-state actors engage in violence against civilians? Why are rape and sexual violence used in times of war and peace? What is settler-colonial violence and how does it manifest itself? What is ethnic cleansing? Does transitional justice bring about justice, or does it impede it? Are truth and reconciliation commissions effective? Do international courts represent survivors of violence or are these courts another tool in the hands of foreign powers? As we explore these questions, we will critically assess how scholars answered these questions from a theoretical and methodological perspective. We will also engage in lively classroom discussions around the central debates that shape our understanding of political violence, and the instruments that are put in place to end it or bring justice to its survivors.

      POLS 3991 - B (3 CR)
      SITUATING NEOLIBERALISM

      Prereqs: POLS 1001; 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course situates neoliberalism, both as an ideology and a cluster of policies, within the broad development of historical social relations and economic systems from antiquity to the present period. The first part of the course will examine the evolution of capitalism in its various stages, with attention paid to specific state policies and class interests. The second portion of the course will then unpack, through certain case studies, the manner in which neoliberalism intersects with other hierarchies and conflicts, such as gender, race, and ethnic violence. 

      POLS 3991 - C (3 CR)
      THE COLD WAR

      Prereqs: POLS 1001; 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      The Cold War was, and remains, a rich case for the study of bipolar distributions of power under anarchy. As we contemplate a potential return to bipolarity, and revisit US-Russia rivalry in the context of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, this reading-intensive course will consider various international relations perspectives on the Cold War international order. We will examine competing ideological convictions, evolving nuclear strategy, alliance formation, dissolution and resistance, and crisis behaviour, and consider critical perspectives and subaltern voices alongside more mainstream approaches. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as INLR 3991 The Cold War and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline. Note 2: This course counts as an International Politics course in the 33/43 series.]

      POLS 4991 - A (3 CR)
      SLAVERY AND FREEDOM

      Prereqs: 3 credits from POLS 3001, 3011; or permission of the Department
      This course surveys the psychological, moral, and political dimensions of some of the most influential ideas of slavery and freedom found in Classical Antiquity, the European Enlightenment, the American Revolution, and contemporary political theory.  In examining these ideas, we hope to better understand the legacy of slavery and what freedom can mean for us today.

      PSYC 3991 - A (3 CR)
      MOTIVATION AND EMOTION

      Prereq: Third-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course discusses two fundamental questions from the perspective of psychology of motivation and emotion: "what causes behaviour" and "why does behaviour vary in intensity?" Topics include psychological needs, social needs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, cognitions, goal setting and emotions. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

      PSYC 4991 - A (3 CR)
      SLEEP, DREAMS AND COGNITION

      Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course examines dream-related theories from multiple psychological disciplines. Through discussions and presentations, the class will evaluate the empirical evidence related to these theories, and connect dreaming to other mental abilities (for example, memory, personality, and creativity). Students will apply their acquired knowledge to analyze their everyday (or every night⁠) experiences. Dreams are among the strangest and mysterious human experiences. Why do we dream? How do we dream? Are dreams useful? Do dreams have hidden meanings? (Format: Seminar)

      RELG 2991-A (3 CR)
      SACRED STUFF

      This course explores relations between material culture and religion. It is built around the hands-on study and analysis of diverse objects including articles of clothing, statuary, musical instruments, talismans, and utensils. Approaching our subject in this way, we will focus especially on connections between religion, material culture, and memory. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

      RELG 2991 - B (3 CR)
      GENDER, COLONIALISM, AND RELIGION

      Gender, Colonialism and Religion explores the interconnectedness of colonialism and religion(s), and their mutual influence on how categories such as sex, gender, and sexuality are expressed and understood both locally and globally. This course covers the entanglements between “Church” and “State” in precolonial and colonial Europe, and how these relationships influenced gender regulation at the advent of settler colonialism. This course further explores temporary and historical expressions of gender, sex, and sexuality that exist outside of and defy settler colonial logics. Topics include intersectional analyses of (anti)colonial gender configurations in North America and globally; critical analyses of contemporary gender discourse and its relationships to neocolonialism; and histories of religion(s) as tools of restriction as well as liberation. (Format: Lecture)

      RELG 3991 - A (3 CR)
      RELIGION, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY

      Prereq: 6 credits from RELG; or permission of the Department
      This course explores the many complex connections between contemporary identity, relationship and community. Drawing on the wealth of religious thought and tradition, it considers central questions such as what makes a healthy community? How does individual identity relate to community identity? What freedoms, expectations and obligations does living in community bring? And ultimately, to what extent can religion continue to provide guidance in a contemporary secular society? Topics investigate notions of identity alongside such issues as postcolonialism, ecology, nostalgia, ableism, and social mobilization. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CENL 3991 Religion, Community, Identity and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]

      RELG 3991 - B (3 CR)
      THE WAYS OF PILGRIMAGE

      Prereq: 6 credits from RELG; or permission of the Department
      This course compares traditions of religious pilgrimage to contemporary instances of journeying, travel and human movement. The notion of pilgrimage will be explored broadly with attention to its philosophical, spiritual and cultural significance. This sense of pilgrimage will then be compared to contemporary issues from both within and beyond the traditional religious context. Topics include such diverse examples as the traditional Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route, contemporary eco-tourism, political protest and, secular “civic” religiosity. 

      VMCS 4991 – A (3 CR)
      VISUAL AND POPULAR CULTURE: ANIME, COMIC BOOKS, AND GRAPHIC NOVELS

      Prereqs: 3 credits from VMCS 1201, 1301; or permission of the Department
      By focusing on a selection of visually enticing and globally impactful mediums of expression (anime, comic books, and graphic novels), this course examines topical themes and issues in visual popular culture, including: the representation of gender and sexuality in digital media; the power of visual expression to animate and transform public spaces and social media; the transnational circulation of cultural representations and beliefs; inclusion and exclusion in social structures and interactions; the effects of globalisation, technology, and consumerism; and the process of cultural adaptation or resistance and the cognitive strategies undergirding these responses. Special attention will be paid to generic conventions, aesthetic features, narrative motifs, thematic emphases, socio-cultural relevance, as well as marketing strategies and fan engagement. Students will analyse anime, comic books, and graphic novels as visual forms with global circulation and as products of adaptation, while relating them to global culture and critical context.

      WGST 3991 - A (3 CR)
      INDIGENOUS FEMINISMS

      Prereq: 6 credits from WGST; or 6 credits from INDG; or permission of the Program Director
      This introduces Indigenous approaches to feminism and Indigenous feminisms in historical and contemporary contexts. Course topics may include: Indigenous sovereignty, Two-Spirit and queer Indigeneity, land defense, gendered violence and MMIW2SG, decolonization, resurgence, and more.

      Special topic courses — Winter 2023

      ARTH 4991 - A (3 CR)
      TRANSGENDER REPRESENTATION

      Prereq: ARTH 2101 (or FINH 2101); ARTH/MUSE 2111 (or FINH 2111); 3 credits from ARTH (or FINH) at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
      Considering the breadth of misinformation and harmful representations of transgender people in mainstream media, positive and meaningful representation has become essential to the transgender community. This course will explore transgender representation in visual media, from film and TV to selfies and self-portraiture. Along with exploring the harmful representations in media, this course will also highlight the joy of positive representation in art for the trans community.

      ARTS 2991 - A (3 CR)
      ART AND ATHLETICS

      This course explores the intersections of the arts and athletics, considering how the two realms contribute to personal identity, community development, and ethical engagement. Discussion topics will include physicality and intellectual life, ethical and aesthetic issues, and political and social contexts at the intersection of the arts and athletics. Artistic media will include literature, painting, photography, music, film and television, as well as some depictions in media from ancient cultures. Several sports will be included, with specific texts focusing on gridiron football, boxing, weightlifting, and figure skating. The central sport for the course is gridiron football. Opportunities will also be created for students to work independently on other sports, including running and swimming. We will frequently discuss the way art and athletics engage in activism and social justice: how both can serve – and serve together – as agents for societal change.

      BIOL 3991 - A (3 CR)
      HISTOLOGY

      Prereq: 3 credits from BIOL 2301, 2401; BIOL 2811; or permission of the instructor
      This course focuses on histology and histopathology. Histology, or microscopic anatomy, is the branch of biology concerned with the composition and structure of multi-cellular plant and animal tissues in relation to their specialized functions. Histopathology is the study of abnormal cellular morphology and function and is a cornerstone of human and veterinary medicine. The course covers the evolution of metazoans, and the interplay between structure and function of cellular organizational patterns to produce organs. It aims to provide students with practical skills in microscopy, tissue staining, and independent laboratory problem solving. Through an emphasis on lab skills, students will learn to identify cellular organizations, correlate structure and function, dissect plants and animals, fix “wet” tissues and prepare it for staining, paraffin embed tissues, and section and stain the tissues. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory)

      BIOL 3991 - B (3 CR)
      SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION

      Prereqs: Third-year standing; 3 credits from BIOL 1001, 1501; or permission of the Department.
      This course will teach upper year students in biology and related fields the fundamentals of science communication. Topics will cover ideas relating to how we perceive and construct knowledge in the biological sciences (e.g., learning theory and rhetorical studies), as well as build practical skills in public engagement (e.g., live programming and media science) and academic communications (e.g., professional scientific writing and presentations). Examples will be drawn from the biological sciences, and students will have the opportunity to tailor assignments to areas of biology that interest them. Evaluation will be based on assignments, projects, and class participation. (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 hours)

      BIOL 3991 - C (3 CR)
      EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE

      Prereqs: BIOL 2811; or permission of the Department.
      Medicine is often concerned with the mechanisms that underly human health conditions (i.e. how we get sick), but an evolutionary perspective helps to explain why we are vulnerable to these conditions in the first place (i.e., why we get sick). This course examines the relevance of contemporary evolutionary theories and knowledge for understanding human health and disease. The course stresses the benefits of analyzing complex problems, such as medicine, from an interdisciplinary lens. (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 hours)

      CANA 2991 - A (3 CR)
      BEYOND THE NUCLEAR FAMILY: FAMILY AND KINSHIP IN CANADA

      Prereq: CANA 1001; CANA 1011; or permission of the Program Director
      This course explores family and kinship in Canada by examining policies that have (re)shaped normative definitions of the family. This course will explore the repercussions of historical laws and policies implemented by the settler colonial government that continue to influence contemporary state definitions of who constitutes family in Canada.

      CANA 4991 - A (3 CR)
      CITIZENSHIP AND DEMOCRACY IN CANADA

      Prereq: CANA 1001; CANA 1011; 3 credits from CANA at the 2/3000 level; or permission of the Program Director
      This seminar explores controversies with regard to democracy and citizenship in Canada. It is an experimental course that looks to build a collaborative space within which we can address deeply significant matters of contemporary Canadian public life. Some of the key issues it addresses include decolonization and reconciliation, alt.right populism, digital democracy, and contemporary conflicts regarding rights and responsibilities.

      CENL 1991 - A (3 CR)
      EDUCATION, MENTORSHIP, AND ATHLETICS

      This course is an introduction to community engaged learning (CENL) for students who wish to connect mentoring and community work in the K-12 education system. It is well-suited to individuals who already volunteer as coaches and mentors, or those who are considering careers in sports or recreation administration, and education. It explores what CENL means in the context of K-12 education, examines the skill sets and knowledge which university students bring to CENL, and investigates the many benefits of young adult-youth mentorship. Participants will travel to a local school every Friday, over a six week period, to work with Grades 3-8 students. Through the supervision of activities and informal mentoring, participants will have an opportunity to apply previous knowledge and experience they may have along with insights gained from course readings and discussion.

      CHEM 4991 - A (3 CR)
      ANALYTICAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

      Prereqs: CHEM 3421; CHEM 3521 (or CHEM 4521 20/WI); or permission of the Department.
      This experiential course exposes students to the concepts and techniques of sample collection, sample preparation, and measurement used for the analysis of trace chemical species in complex mixtures in environmental media (e.g., water, air, soil, and biota). Hypothesis development, experimental design, as well as data analysis and interpretation are emphasized. Students may be involved in field measurements. (Format: Integrated Lecture/Laboratory, 6 Hours)

      DRAM 2991 - A (3 CR)
      PHYSICAL THEATRE - MASK

      Prereq: Permission of the instructor
      This course introduces students to the theory and practice of physical theatre acting through the creation and use of neutral and character mask in the tradition of Jacques Lecoq and Philippe Gaulier.

      FINA 2991 - B (3 CR)
      BEADWORK: CULTURE AND HISTORY

      Prereqs: INDG 1001; 3 credits from CANA or FINA or FINH; or permission of the Program Director
      Through an exploration of traditional and contemporary forms of Indigenous beadwork and beadworking techniques, through meaning-making and object-making, the course will illuminate the inherent cultural values surrounding beading in Indigenous culture. Students will learn and apply bead-working techniques to demonstrate learned skills through various projects, which may include sample charts of beadwork techniques, bracelets, key chains, earrings, or other items. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with INDG 2991 Beadwork: Culture and History and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

      FREN-3991 - A (3 CR)
      EVOLUTION AND GENDER

      Prereqs: FREN 2601; or permission of the Department
      This course examines the rhetorical intersections between various discourses dealing with gender and evolutionary thought.  Key oppositions are explored in various traditions of representation.  These include fixism vs. transformism, existentialism vs. essentialism and idealism vs. materialism.  Textual and non-textual sources will be used to demonstrate how gender tropes (and precursors to these) are conceptualized across medicine, literature and philosophy, among other disciplines.  Special attention will be paid to events, discoveries, and behaviours that challenge or disrupt epistemological boundaries.  

      GENS 3991 - B (3 CR)
      REMOTE SENSING

      Prereq: GENS 2441; or permission of the Department
      This course examines the principles of remote sensing of the environment, and provides an overview of the range and diversity of sensor platforms currently deployed around the world. Students will be introduced to software for viewing and processing remote sensing imagery, and apply various image analysis techniques in order to answer applied questions about the state of the environment. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory: 1.5 Hours)

      HIST 3991 - A (3 CR)
      CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

      Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course starts from the present need to shift away from a fossil-fuel based economy and asks: What can we learn about energy transitions from considering past ones? Topics will include the history of coal and oil, the Green Revolution, and electrification, among others.

      INDG 2991 - A (3 CR)
      LEARNING TO DESIRE: A CRITICAL EXPLORATION OF INDIGENEITY

      Prereq: 3 credits from CANA 1001, 1011, INDG 1001; or permission of the Program Director
      This course will see learners reflect on what has shaped and informed their identities. Damage narratives are perpetuated about Indigenous peoples in a variety of areas. This course will explore how damage has informed a frame of reference for Indigenous peoples and how it may affect the conceptual map of those it subjects. This course acknowledges damage but struggles for desire-based understandings. Moving from ‘decolonial’ strategies in academia to a new emergence, this course aims to utilize reframing (Smith, 2021) as the foundation. An important assessment tool will be reflection, as students consider positioning, how truth and knowledge are maintained and how our bodies react to and struggle against these knowings. This course takes caution and acknowledges the triggering effects discussions of identity can have on people and will incorporate supportive techniques as learners and instructors move through course objectives. Ultimately, this course aims to take the learner on a journey from damage to desire.

      INDG 2991 - B (3 CR)
      BEADWORK: CULTURE AND HISTORY

      Prereqs: INDG 1001; 3 credits from CANA or FINA or FINH; or permission of the Program Director
      Through an exploration of traditional and contemporary forms of Indigenous beadwork and beadworking techniques, through meaning-making and object-making, the course will illuminate the inherent cultural values surrounding beading in Indigenous culture. Students will learn and apply bead-working techniques to demonstrate learned skills through various projects, which may include sample charts of beadwork techniques, bracelets, key chains, earrings, or other items. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with FINA 2991 Beadwork: Culture and History and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

      INLR 4991- B (3 CR)
      AFRICAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT

      Prereqs: 3 credits from POLS or INLR at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
      This seminar delves into the political and economic trajectories that have shaped the African continent from the pre-colonial era to the present. The course will examine social formations in Africa prior to colonization, and will then proceed to analyze how imperialism has shaped state formation, ethnic conflict, and class relations into the present period. The second portion of the course will then analyze specific country cases in order to identify the dynamics driving neoliberalism, underdevelopment, and military rule on the continent. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with POLS 4991 African Political Development and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

      MATH 3991 - A (3 CR)
      COMBINATORICS

      Prereq: MATH/COMP 2211; or permission of the Department
      This course focuses on combinations and arrangements of discrete structures.  Enumerative topics will include combinatorial proofs, counting with repetitions, recursion, and generating functions.  Design Theory topics will include latin squares, designs, and error-correcting codes.

      PHIL 3991 - B (3 CR)
      SCIENCE AND DEMOCRACY

      Prereq: 3 credits from PHIL; 3 credits from PHIL at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course pursues a simple but highly debated question: what is the proper place of science in a democratic society? Through this pursuit, we will examine how science and technology both shape politics and are shaped by politics. The course is designed to move beyond the typical standoff between supporters and critics of science and technology. Science and technology are neither value-neutral tools of inevitable social progress nor inhuman forces of disenchantment and destruction (though we will look at where those vying ideas come from). Rather, science and technology are intertwined with social values and political decisions. Course readings aim to encourage discussion about the questions: What is science and what is the aim of science? What is the aim of democracy? What role do values play in science? Is science inherently democratic? What does science look like under other political configurations? What is the relation between experts and ordinary citizens? What responsibilities do scientists have qua scientists? We will also consider how answers to these theoretical questions bear on historical and contemporary issues, such as eugenics and human enhancement, vaccination, genetically modified organisms, and climate change.

      POLS 3991 - A (3 CR)
      GLOBAL LABOUR STUDIES

      Prereq: POLS 1001; 6 credits from POLS at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      From Amazon to Starbucks, to the Sudanese Professional Association, and many more, labour movements and labour unions have been the center of analysis and media coverage for progressive politics. This course explores various categories and sectors of work, as well as the different forms of labour organizing and labour movements across time, space, and sectors of the economy. We investigate in particular the relationship between labour movements and democratic transitions, and the consolidation of democracy and labour rights. The course is centered around the idea that despite the neoliberal attack on the working class and labour movements, labour movements are still salient and do matter in the social and political struggles for social justice. In particular, the course surveys past and present struggles by workers in the formal and the informal economy and examines how such struggles intertwine with broader issues of social justice, human dignity, and self-determination.

      POLS 4991- A (3 CR)
      DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

      Prereqs: 3 credits from POLS or INLR at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course focuses on the shifts from state led development to neoliberalism in Latin America and the Middle East. It roots the origins of economic models at times in responses to and at others in the continuation of the legacies of imperialism and colonialism in the global south. Students will consider how such economic models were wedded to political regimes, and how these regimes reflected class and political interests all the while marginalizing the poor and the working class. We also examine social movements’ struggles (workers; landless peasants; women; environmentalists; indigenous communities) in the two regions and explore whether alternatives to these economic models are being discussed. The focus will be on select cases from the Middle East and Latin America.

      POLS 4991- B (3 CR)
      AFRICAN POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT

      Prereqs: 3 credits from POLS or INLR at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
      This seminar delves into the political and economic trajectories that have shaped the African continent from the pre-colonial era to the present. The course will examine social formations in Africa prior to colonization, and will then proceed to analyze how imperialism has shaped state formation, ethnic conflict, and class relations into the present period. The second portion of the course will then analyze specific country cases in order to identify the dynamics driving neoliberalism, underdevelopment, and military rule on the continent. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with INLR 4991 African Political Development and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.]

      POLS 4991- C (3 CR)
      RACE AND RECOGNITION

      Prereqs: 3 credits from POLS 3001, 3011; or permission of the Department
      This course will examine the philosophical roots of the concept of recognition and its relation to freedom and justice.  We will also examine the question of indigenous rights and the claim that the politics of recognition have served to advance colonialism.  Are an anti-colonial or postcolonial politics of recognition possible, or must the politics of recognition be rejected as part of the settler colonial legacy?

      PSYC 3991 - B (3 CR)
      EXERCISE AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION

      Prereqs: Third-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course addresses the physiological and psychological changes that occur in the context of acute and chronic exercise in various populations. It will introduce selected principles, research findings, and theories relevant to how exercise affects cognition. Topics will include cardiovascular fitness, measurement issues, cognitive performance, sex differences, aging and cognitive decline.

      PSYC 3991 - C (3 CR)
      INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

      Prereqs: Third-year standing; PSYC 1001; PSYC 1011; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This course provides information about Industrial and Organizational Psychology (I/O psychology), which studies human behaviour in the workplace using the science-practitioner model. Topics include the appropriate use of people or human resources such as job analysis, performance appraisal, selection, placement, understanding employee behaviour and enhancing the well-being of the employees such as job attitudes, counterproductive work behaviour, health and workplace stress. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

      PSYC 4991 - A (3 CR)
      ADVANCED TOPICS IN ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

      Prereqs: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      Recommended prereq: PSYC 2301 (not required)
      This course is an advanced course including topics from Organizational Psychology such as job satisfaction, person-environment fit, work-life balance, personality at workplace, motivation, performance and selection. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

      PSYC 4991 - B (3 CR)
      PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDITATION

      Prereqs: Third-year standing; 6 credits from PSYC at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
      This is an advanced course in psychology that will focus on how meditation affects the mind and brain. This course will focus on recent scientific research on how meditation affects our thinking, feeling, attention, memory, and brain activity.  The aim of this course is to help develop a deeper understanding of the influence of meditation on our psychology, while also advancing a critical analysis of research design and interpretation. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

      RELG 1991 - A (3 CR)
      CULTS AND NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS

      This course explores movements, peoples, traditions, and practices that have gained popularity in the modern era, with a focus on religious movements often referred to as “cults.” Guiding questions include: What is a “cult?” Which criteria determine whether a religious movement is labeled as such? We will explore some of the most infamous religious groups labeled “cults” to gain a better understanding of their inner logics as well as their reception by mainstream audiences. Topics include apocalyptic movements, religions and sex scandals, and portrayal of new religious movements in popular culture.

      SOCI 4991 – A (3 CR)
      ADVANCED TOPICS IN THE SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH

      Prereqs: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
      This course provides a critical overview of the problems of mental health and illness from a sociological perspective. Topics include: the theoretical foundations of the sociology of mental health, the social conditions that influence mental well-being, the experiences and social meanings of mental illness and its treatment, institutionalization and deinstitutionalization, and the social construction of mental disorders. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

      WGST 2991 - A (3 CR)
      FEMINISM ACROSS BORDERS

      Prereq: 3 credits from WGST 1001; or Second-year standing; or permission of the Program Director
      This course focuses on feminist engagements with, within, and beyond the institution of the modern nation-state. Providing an overview of historical and contemporary feminist organizing in international and transnational contexts, the theme of borders is examined at multiple levels. Rooted in anti-racist and anti-colonial feminisms, specific course topics may include transnational surrogacy, Indigenous land defense, environmental justice movements, transnational prison abolition movements, transnational sex work. Course materials will include scholarly texts, videos, blog posts, visual and performance art, and social media interventions.

      Maple League courses

      Maple League courses are open to students from all four Maple League universities: Acadia, Bishop's, Mount Allison, and St. Francis Xavier.

      Maple League courses — Fall 2022

      PHIL 3991 (3 CR)
      AESTHETICS OF SPORT AND DANCE

      This course is a specialized elective on the philosophical aesthetics of sport and dance. Topics to be covered include aesthetic sports, the aesthetics of dance, aesthetic experiences of movement from observers' and performers' perspectives, dance as an artform, subjectivity and expertise in the aesthetic judgement of movement, sport as art, and dance as sport. Most classes will focus on a single assigned reading, beginning with an overview lecture followed by a seminar-style critical discussion. Regular attendance and significant class participation are expected. (Offered by: Acadia - KINE 3383)
       

      Maple League courses — Winter 2023

      SOCI 3511 (3 CR)
      SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

      (Offered by: Acadia - KINE 4833)

      Courses with placement tests

      Before you can register for certain courses, you may need to complete a placement test. Most placements tests can be found in Moodle > Placement tests.

      French placement tests

      If you would like to take a French course, and have not already done so at Mount Allison, you must complete the French placement test to help us place you in the appropriate course. You will not be able to register for a French course until you receive written permission from the department.

      The French placement test is available on Moodle > Placement tests.

      If you experience any difficulties logging into Moodle please email helpdesk@mta.ca or phone (506) 364-2473.

      Once your test has been assessed you will receive an e-mail notifying you of course placement.

      To register for your French course(s), send an e-mail to reghelp@mta.ca indicating clearly the section of the course you wish to register for. The registration helpdesk personnel will verify your name against the French placement list and register you in the appropriate course and section.

      Should you have any questions or comments about the assessment, please feel free to contact the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at mll@mta.ca.

      German and Spanish placement tests

      If you have experience with the Spanish or German languages and don’t believe the introductory courses would be appropriate to your skill level, you may write the placement assessments.

      Placement tests are available in Moodle > Placement tests.

      Math assessment test for calculus

      For students wanting to register for  MATH 1151.

      The Math Assessment Test is used to determine your present mathematics ability.

      Any student may proceed to register for MATH 1151 but will have to write the assessment test. This is a twenty-five question multiple choice test designed to let you know if you are ready for calculus.

      If you don’t pass the test, you must take Functions (Math 1011) instead of calculus in the fall term (you can then proceed with MATH 1151 in the winter term).

      To take the test:

      You can take the test whenever you are ready, on your own computer. The test is available in Moodle > Placement tests.

      We strongly suggest you take it before the Fall term begins. More information, including practice tests and information on how to prepare, is available on the Mathematics and Computer Science department.

       

      Course exclusions

      What does it mean if there is an exclusion list found in a course description?

      If you've already taken a course listed in the exclusion list found in a course description, you won't be able to count the credits from that course towards your degree.

      What are course exclusions?

      Exclusions are listed because some courses cover similar material. Students should not earn credit for taking two courses which are quite similar. However, the exclusion does not imply that the courses are interchangeable. Programs often require a specific course selection.

      The exclusion means that the course you want to take has significant overlap with the course you have already taken (or are currently taking) and therefore you may not take both courses for credit towards your degree. If you do take both courses you will only be able to use credits from one of the courses taken, not both, towards your degree requirements.

      Students should seek academic advising in all cases by emailing advisor@mta.ca.

      Connect will not prevent you from enrolling in a course that is an exclusion with one you have already taken, or are currently taking. Also, your transcript will not indicate if an excluded course is completed.

      Course exclusions for 2021-22 (pdf):

      Questions? Contact the Registrar's Office at regoffice@mta.ca or call (506) 364-2269.