Registration for the 2021-22 academic year is now open to students who have paid the registration deposit. 

The student-run registration helpdesk is available to assist all new and returning students with registration questions. 

Complete your course registration in both Fall and Winter courses as early as possible to avoid waitlists and ensure access to your preferred courses.

Late registration may result in an inconvenient schedule, or inability to take required courses. We recommend that you complete course registration by mid-June.


Steps to register for courses

Step 1: Getting started

Visit advising and degree planning to familiarize yourself with:

  • degree requirements and distribution requirements
  • resources to help plan your degree
  • information on majors, minors, and honours
Advice for first-year students on choosing courses

Your first year of university should, to some extent, be a time of exploration.

Take the opportunity to explore subjects and courses that are new or unfamiliar to you. First-year is designed to be flexible and provide you with the opportunity to broaden your horizons.

That said, the transition from high school to university is a significant one.

Choosing courses in which you can reasonably expect to succeed is wise. It may be unwise to choose all of your courses in unfamiliar academic disciplines.

If you have a career goal in mind, you might wish to choose some courses in line with those objectives and select others out of personal interest. Think ahead and plan carefully to keep your options open.

It is also important to work towards meeting core degree and program requirements. In first-year, these are more or less flexible depending on your degree program.

Take some time to peruse our Academic Calendar where you will find program requirements, and course descriptions. Follow the program requirements outlined in the calendar corresponding to the year in which you begin your studies at Mount Allison.

See step 2 below for advice on specific course selection by degree program. 

Glossary of academic terms

Below is a collection of academic terms you are likely to come across as you register for courses.

Academic calendar 
The academic calendar is a comprehensive guide to all degrees, programs and courses at Mount Allison University. It outlines academic requirements, and University policies and procedures. The calendar can be found at mta.ca/calendar. You should follow the program requirements outlined in the Calendar corresponding to the year you began your studies at Mount Allison.

Academic timetable
The academic timetable identifies which courses are being offered in any given academic year. It lists the day and time that courses have been scheduled for, as well as the instructor and location. 

Term 
Term (or semester) means a period of approximately 14 consecutive weeks during which the university is in session. The fall term starts in September, the winter term in January, and the spring term in May.

Course
A course is a unit of work in a particular subject normally extending through one term. Successful completion of a course usually carries credit toward obtaining a degree, diploma, or certificate. 

Section
A section is an individual offering of a course. Some courses offer more than one section at different times to keep class sizes small and allow for flexibility in scheduling. Different sections of the same class are indicated by letters at the end of the course number (e.g. ENGL 1201-A, ENGL 1201-B). Multiple lab/tutorial sections are indicated by numbers (e.g. PSYC 220L-1, PSYC 220L-2).

Lecture
A lecture typically involves the course instructor presenting information, themes, and concepts related to the course topic. Most courses have three hours of lecture per week. Lectures are presented to a large class. Questions may be encouraged but usually there is minimal group discussion.

Lab/tutorial
A lab/tutorial is an additional mandatory session (normally one per week) outside of the regular class time which primarily serves to divide the class into smaller groups for more focused instruction, different types of course work or group discussion. Use the academic timetable to determine if a course has a lab or tutorial; within the course number you will read ‘L’ (e.g. ANTH 101L 1, Lab: Intro to Anthropology). You will be required to register for a course and its lab/tutorial separately but at the same time. 

Prerequisite
A prerequisite course is one that must be successfully completed before you begin a second course (e.g.  ECON 1001 is a prerequisite for ECON 2001), and has to be completed with a letter grade of C- or above. The prerequisite course gives you the knowledge you need to succeed in the next, associated course.

Co-requisite
A co-requisite is a course which may be taken before or at the same time as a second course.The co-requisite course provides complementary knowledge required to succeed in both courses.

Cross-listed course
A Cross-listed course is a course listed for credit under more than one discipline. The course may only be taken once for credit. For example, Greece and Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization is listed as HIST 1631 and CLAS 1631.

Distribution requirement
Required for Bachelor of Arts, Science & Commerce, distribution requirements foster a liberal education and encourage academic breadth by requiring students to take courses from a range of academic disciplines.

Elective
An elective is a credit course which you can choose to take in any subject area. It is not mandatory to meet your specific degree or program requirements. Electives help to make up the total number of credits required to complete your degree.

Required course
Specific courses that must be taken and completed with a passing grade to meet program requirements. Each degree and major/minor program has specific required courses which will account for most of the courses in your degree.  

Exclusion
An exclusion is a statement within a course description. Students may not count for credit toward a degree any course which is listed as an exclusion for a course in which they are currently registered or which they have already passed. Exclusions are listed because some courses cover similar material and students should not earn credit for taking two courses which are quite similar. This does not imply that the courses are interchangeable and programs often require a specific course selection.

Program
Program means a series of courses, the completion of which, if the other requirements are met, qualifies you for a degree, diploma, or certificate. 

Credit
Credit is given for courses that you successfully complete. Credit is the weight value assigned to a course. A course that normally meets for three hours each week throughout the full academic year is worth six credits. A course that normally meets for three hours each week in one term is worth three credits. Ensemble performance courses in Music which meet on a regular basis throughout the academic year are worth one credit.

Major
A major is the subject in which you select to do 60 or more credits as required by the program you are attempting to complete. A major is your primary area of specialization.

Minor
A minor is the subject in addition to the major, in which you complete 24 credits according to specific departmental regulations. A minor is a secondary area of specialization. Or, in the case of a general degree, a student may complete three minors in lieu of a major and a minor.

Full-time
A full-time student is a student enrolled in the equivalent of nine or more credits per term.

    Step 2: Plan your schedule

    Go to choose your courses and plan your schedule for:

    • courses offered in the upcoming academic year
    • blank timetables and course planning worksheets to help plan your schedule
    • information on course delivery formats
    • a list of courses without prerequisites, courses with placement tests, and special topic courses

    Advice on specific course selection by degree:

    First-year courses for Bachelor of Arts

    There are no required courses for first-year Arts students.

    First-year study offers you an opportunity to explore a wide range of subjects while completing the distribution requirements of the Bachelor of Arts degree program. Distribution requirements ensure breadth in your program, and can also offer you first contact with subject areas in which you may decide to complete a major or a minor.

    You should consider enrolling in at least one course from each of the four distribution areas — Arts & Letters, Humanities, Science, and Social Science. You are strongly advised to focus on your distribution requirements in your first year, though distribution requirements may be spread across all four years of study.

    First-year courses are often prerequisites for more advanced courses. Plan ahead and think about a possible major and minor area of study when selecting introductory level courses. Many students aren’t certain what they would like to choose for a major and minor. This is normal, and, in fact, it can even be a good thing!

    You are encouraged to explore your options and discover what Mount A has to offer. You are not required to declare a major and minor until the end of your second year of studies or upon completion of 54 credits. All Arts students are strongly encouraged to consult with an advisor when deciding which courses should be a priority for completion.

    Bachelor of Arts students may be interested in taking ARTS 1991 "Thinking Through the Arts" in the fall term. The course considers how the applied and academic arts contribute to society. It aims to develop the skills required for active interpretation and critical thinking through the arts. It is also a course that develops basic learning competencies, including mental discipline, memory work, active reading, and communication skills. ARTS 1991 may be completed remotely although this is not indicated on the timetable.

    Students looking for a 'writing course' may register for any first year English course.

    While there are no required courses for first-year Arts students, below are some suggested courses for first-year students who are interested in pursuing majors and/or minors in any of the following disciplines.

    *It is recommended that those students who choose to take ECON 1001 and ECON 1011 register for one in the Fall term and the other in the Winter term

    American Studies

    • ENGL 1201, HIST 1601, *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011

    Art History

    • FINH 2101, FINH 2111

    Canadian Public Policy

    • POLS 1001, *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011

    Canadian Studies (see also Indigenous Studies)

    • CANA 1001, CANA 1011, INDG 1001

    Classical Studies

    • Classical Studies (CLAS) courses at the 1600 level (any courses coded CLAS-16XX such as CLAS-1631)
    • Additional suggestions: LATI 1001, LATI 1011
    • Note: Any humanities (CLAS, HIST, PHIL, RELG) courses at the 1600 level may count toward majors and minors in Classical Studies, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies

    Cognitive Science — major only

    • COMP 1631, COMP 1731
    • PSYC 1001, PSYC 1011 (May be taken in either order. Neither is a prerequisite to the other)
    • Philosophy (PHIL) course at the 1600 level (any courses coded PHIL-16XX such as PHIL-1611)

    Commerce

    • COMM 1011, COMM 1411, *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011
    • Mathematics (MATH 1151 or MATH 1311) course (excluding MATH 1011) or Computer Science (COMP 1631) course

    Community Engaged Learning — minor only

    • CENL 1001

    Computer Science

    • COMP 1631, COMP 1731
    • MATH 1151
    • Additional Suggestions: MATH 1121 or MATH 1311

    Drama Studies

    • DRAM 1701
    • Additional suggestions: DRAM 2151

    Economics

    • ECON *1001, *ECON 1011
    • MATH 1151
    • ECON 1701

    Economics and Computer Science — joint major

    • COMP 1631, COMP 1731
    • *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011
    • ECON 1701 or MATH 1311
    • MATH 1151 

    English

    • ENGL 1201
    • One from ENGL 1501, 1701, 1801

    Environmental Studies

    • GENS 1401, GENV 1201, GENV 2001
    • One from BIOL 1001, CHEM 1001, PHYS 1041, 1051
    • *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011
    • Additional Suggestions: GENS 2421

    Fine Arts

    • FINH 2101, FINH 2111
    • Studio Courses - FINA 1011, FINA 1111, FINA 1921, FINA 1931
    • Note: Students admitted to a Major in Fine Arts will be registered in studio courses
    • Note: Students admitted to a Minor in Fine Arts will be registered in studio courses following consultation with the Fine Arts Department. 

    French

    • FREN 1651, FREN 1701, FREN 1711 (or a higher level depending on placement)
    • FREN 1801
    • Please see information on the French placement test, which must be taken before students are able to register in French language courses

     Geographic Information Systems (GIS) — minor only

    • COMP 1631, COMP 1731
    • GENS 1401 or GENV 1201

    Geocomputing — joint major

    • COMP 1631, COMP 1731
    • GENV 1201, GENS 1401
    • MATH 1151

    Geography

    • GENV 1201, GENS 1401
    • Additional Suggestions: GENS 2421, GENV 2101, GENV 2811

    German Studies — minor only

    • GERM 1001, GERM 1011 (See: Language Placement Tests)

    Greek — minor only

    • GREK 1001, GREK 1011 (not offered in the 2021-22 Academic Year)

    Hispanic Studies

    • SPAN 1011, SPAN 1111 (See: Language Placement Tests)
    • SPAN 1811 

    History

    • History (HIST) courses at the 1600 level (any courses coded HIST-16XX such as HIST-1631)
    • Note: Any humanities (CLAS, HIST, PHIL, RELG) courses at the 1600 level may count toward majors and minors in Classical Studies, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies 

    Indigenous Studies

    • Indigenous Studies (INDG) courses satisfy credit requirements for a selection of interdisciplinary majors and minors. Those students interested in pursuing studies in Indigenous Studies are encouraged to take the following: INDG 1001

    International Economics and Business — minor only

    • *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011
    • Mathematics (MATH 1151 or MATH 1311) course (excluding MATH 1011) or Computer Science (COMP 1631) course 

    Japanese Studies — minor only

    • JAPA 1001, JAPA 1011 

    Latin — minor only

    • LATI 1001, LATI 1011

    Mathematics

    • MATH 1151, MATH 1121
    • COMP 1631
    • Additional suggestions: COMP 1731, MATH 1311 

    Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MLLC)

    • Introductory language courses chosen from three of the four following options (See: Language Placement Tests)
    • French (FREN 1651, FREN 1701, FREN 1711 or higher level depending on placement)
    • German (GERM 1001, GERM 1011)
    • Spanish (SPAN 1011, SPAN 1111)
    • Japanese (JAPA 1001, JAPA 1011)
    • LING 2001

    Museum and Curatorial Studies — minor only

    • FINH 2101, FINH 2111

    Music

    • MUSC 1001 - counts only for the Minor, does not count toward the Major
    • MUSC 2001, MUSC 2021
    • MUSC 1101 (requires completion of an online entrance assessment or successful completion of MUSC 1001)
    • MUSC 1111, MUSC 1201, MUSC 1211, MUSC 1703
    • Ensembles (Symphonic Band, Chamber Orchestra, Choral Society, Elliot Chorale, Jazz Ensemble)  

    Philosophy

    • Philosophy (PHIL) courses at the 1600 level (any courses coded PHIL-16XX such as PHIL-1611)
    • Note: Any humanities (CLAS, HIST, PHIL, RELG) courses at the 1600 level may count toward majors and minors in Classical Studies, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies 

    Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE)

    • Philosophy (PHIL) course at the 1600 level (any courses coded PHIL-16XX such as PHIL-1611)
    • POLS 1001, *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011
    • ECON 1701 or MATH 1311

    Political Science

    • POLS 1001 

    International Relations

    • POLS 1001
    • *ECON 1001, *ECON 1011
    • Language course from French, German, Spanish, or Japanese (See: Language Placement Tests)

    Psychology

    • PSYC 1001, PSYC 1011 (May be taken in either order. Neither is a prerequisite to the other)

    Religious Studies

    • Religious Studies (RELG) courses at the 1600 level (any courses coded RELG-16XX such as RELG-1621)
    • Note: Any humanities courses (CLAS, HIST, PHIL, RELG) at the 1600 level also count toward majors and minors in Classical Studies, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies

    Screen Studies and Popular Culture

    • DRAM 1001

    Sociology

    • SOCI 1001, SOCI 1201

    Visual Communication and Culture — minor only

    • VMCS 1201, VMCS 2111
    • Additional suggestions: CANA 2201

    Visual and Material Culture

    • VMCS 1201, VMCS 1301, VMCS 2111 

    Women’s and Gender Studies

    • WGST 1001
    First-year courses for Bachelor of Science

    First-year courses for Bachelor of Science (2021-2022):

    Science programs expect the completion of specific courses in your intended discipline during your first year.

    You should review section 12 in part III of the academic calendar to determine which first-year courses are required for your intended major and/or minor area of study, and for upper year courses you may be interested in taking.

    You are also advised to review the Bachelor of Science degree requirements as detailed in section 11.3 of the academic calendar.  

    At the same time that you are working towards completion of requirements for a major and minor program, you should take the opportunity to register for courses outside of your intended discipline in order to explore other interests and various program options.

    Many students are uncertain about choosing a major; this can be accommodated by making sure that your first-year course selection gives you the required flexibility.

    Science students are strongly encouraged to consult with an advisor when deciding which courses should be a priority for completion.

    Science students typically complete three to six credits of distribution requirements each year. Over the course of your degree you are required to complete six credits from each of the non-Science distribution areas: Arts & Letters, Humanities, and Social Science.

    Please review this information regarding a Math Assessment Test for calculus (MATH 1151) which should be written prior to classes beginning in the fall.  

    Following are recommended courses for first year students wishing to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in each of the Science disciplines.

    Aviation

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: COMP 1631, PHYS 1051, MATH 1151, GENS 1401
    • Winter term: PHYS 1551, GENS 2421

    Also recommended for first year:  

    • COMP 1731, MATH 1121

    Students interested in pursuing the Bachelor of Commerce — Aviation can find course selection information under First-year courses for Bachelor of Commerce.

    Biochemistry

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: BIOC 1001*, BIOL 1001** CHEM 1001, PHYS 1051, MATH 1151
    • Winter term: BIOL 1501, CHEM 1021, PHYS 1551***, MATH 1121

    *BIOC (Biochem) 1001 must be taken in the fall term as it is the prerequisite for BIOL 1501

    **BIOL (Biology) 1001 can be taken in Fall of second year. It is required for many 2000 level Biology courses

     

    ***PHYS 1551 can be taken in second year if necessary but it may conflict with second year courses

    Biology

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: BIOC 1001*, BIOL 1001, CHEM 1001
    • Winter term: BIOL 1501
    • MATH 1151
    • three credits from PHYS 1041 or 1051

    Also recommended for first year:

    • three credits from MATH 1121,1311, 2221, or COMP 1631

    *BIOC (Biochem) 1001 must be taken in the fall term as it is the prerequisite for BIOL 1501

    Chemistry

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: BIOC 1001, CHEM 1001, PHYS 1051, MATH 1151
    • Winter term: CHEM 1021, PHYS 1551, MATH 1121

    Cognitive Science

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • PSYC 1001 & PSYC 1011*
    • Fall term: COMP 1631, MATH 1151
    • Winter term: COMP 1731
    • three credits from CHEM 1001, PHYS 1041, or PHYS 1051

    Also recommended for first year:

    • three credits from the Humanities 1600 series (CLAS, HIST, PHIL, RELG)

    *PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1011 are both offered in the fall and winter terms. They can be taken in either order, or concurrently.

    Computer Science

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: COMP 1631  MATH 1151, CHEM 1001, PHYS 1051*
    • Winter term: MATH 1121, MATH 1311, COMP 1731, PHYS 1551*

    Also recommended for first year:  

    • three credits from BIOL 1001, 1501, BIOC 1001, GENS 1401, PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1011

    *A B.Sc. with Major in Computer Science requires 6 credits (2 courses) from CHEM 1001, PHYS 1051, PHYS 1551. If students takes BOTH CHEM 1001 and PHYS 1051 in the Fall term, then PHYS 1551 is NOT required in the Winter term. On the other hand, if students opt to only takes PHYS 1051 in the Fall, then they should register for PHYS 1551 in the Winter.

    Environmental Science
     
    Recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: GENS 1401, BIOL 1001, BIOC 1001, CHEM 1001
    • Winter term: BIOL 1501, GENS 2421, GENS 2101
    • MATH 1151

    Further recommendations for completion of the major:   

    • three credits from PHYS 1051 or 1041
    • from second year, courses comprising the major are organized by thematic streams. Students are advised to consult the academic calendar to identify a single stream of interest and select from the options identified for that stream.

    Mathematics

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: MATH 1151, CHEM 1001, PHYS 1051, COMP 1631
    • Winter term: MATH 1121, COMP 1731, three credits from CHEM 1021 or PHYS 1551

    Also recommended for first year:

    • three credits from BIOL 1001, 1501, BIOC 1001, GENS 1401, PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1011

    Physics

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • Fall term: PHYS 1051, MATH 1151, CHEM 1001
    • Winter term: PHYS 1551, MATH 1121, CHEM 1021

    Also recommended for first year:  

    • COMP 1631

    Psychology

    Strongly recommended for first year:

    • PSYC 1001 & PSYC 1011*
    • MATH 1151

    Also recommended for first year:

    • three credits from PHYS 1041, 1051, or CHEM 1001
    • three credits from MATH 1121, 1311, 2221, or COMP 1631
    • three credits from BIOL 1001, 1501, or BIOC 1001

    *PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1011 are both offered in the fall and winter terms. They can be taken in either order, or concurrently.

     

    A list of minors available for the B.Sc. can be found in section 11.3.24 and 11.2.21 of the academic calendar.

    Science students completing a non-Science minor should keep in mind the BSc degree requirement of 72 credits from Science courses, of which 30 credits must be at the 3/4000 level.

    First-year courses for Bachelor of Commerce

    Commerce — General

    Strongly recommended:

    • Fall: ECON 1001 or 1011, COMM 1411
    • Winter: ECON 1001 or 1011, COMM 1011

    Also recommended:  

    • 3 credits from ECON 1701 or MATH 1311*
    • 3 credits from COMP or MATH (excluding MATH 1011)**

    Bachelor of Commerce — General students are advised to work towards completing distribution requirements in Humanities and Arts and Letters , and sampling introductory courses with a view to choosing a minor.

    *MATH 1311 is an option for the Bachelor of Commerce statistics requirement (see section 11.5.5 of the academic calendar). If you intend on using MATH 1311 towards your statistic requirement, you must take it in your first year.

    **MATH 1111 or 1151 is required for Honours in Economics. Please review this information regarding the Math Assessment Test for calculus (MATH 1111 or 1151) which should be written prior to classes beginning in the fall. Note: Only MATH 1151 is offered in the 2021-2022 year.  

     
    Commerce— Aviation  

    Strongly recommended:  

    • Fall: ECON 1001 or 1011, COMM 1411, GENS 1401
    • Winter: ECON 1001 or 1011, COMM 1011, GENS 2421

    Also recommended:

    • 3 credits from Computer Science or Math (excluding MATH 1011)
    • 3 credits from ECON 1701 or MATH 1311*

    Bachelor of Commerce — Aviation students are advised to work towards completing distribution requirements in Humanities and Arts and Letters. The requirement of a minor for Commerce-Aviation is waived, and students do not complete any non-Commerce electives. Students in Commerce-Aviation are advised to only take the courses required for their degree (see section 11.5.12 of the academic calendar). If you have questions regarding required courses, please contact the academic advisor (advisor@mta.ca) or program advisor. Students interested in the Bachelor of Science with major in Aviation can find course selection information here.

    *MATH 1311 is an option for the Bachelor of Commerce statistics requirement (see section 11.5.5 of the academic calendar). If you intend on using MATH 1311 towards your statistic requirement, you must take it in your first year.

    **If you choose to complete MATH 1111 or 1151 for this requirement, please review this information regarding the Math Assessment Test (MATH 1111 or 1151) which should be written prior to classes beginning in the fall. Note: Only MATH 1151 is offered in the 2021-2022 year.

    First-year courses for Bachelor of Music

    First-year Music students normally enrol in:

    • Music 1501, 1511, 1101, 1111, 1201, 1211, 1703 (a full year three-credit course)
    • nine credits of non-Music electives (distributed as six credits in one term, and three credits in the other.)

    Note that registration in Music 1101 is based on the Music entrance assessment, normally taken during the audition period in March/April or in early September.

    Students who are not placed in MUSC 1101 should contact the Music Department at music@mta.ca for additional course selection advice.

    If your principle instrument is keyboard (piano or organ), you should also register for MUSC 1601: Collaborative Keyboard I.

    If your principle instrument is voice, you must register for MUSC 1521: Diction for Singers (if it is offered). MUSC 1601 or 1521 would replace three non-Music elective credits.
     
    Students are also required to register for one major large ensemble (Symphonic Band or Choral Society), worth one credit. String students should register for Chamber Orchestra. Registration in an ensemble will be completed for you once placement is finalized in September.

    Students who are admitted to the Bachelor of Music degree will be pre-registered in all Music courses based on the recommendation of the Music department and will only have to register for non-Music electives chosen from any subject area.

    Bachelor of Music students are not required to complete distribution credits or a major or minor program. 

    First-year courses for Bachelor of Fine Arts

    In the fall and winter terms, first-year Fine Arts students take:

    • three studio courses
    • one art history course
    • one elective course from outside of Fine Arts and Art History

    The Fall term normally includes:

    • FINA 1101, 1921, 1941 (studio)
    • FINH 2101 (art history)

    The Winter term normally includes:

    • FINA 1111, 1931, 1951 (studio)
    • FINH 2111 (art history)

    Students who are admitted to the BFA degree will be pre-registered in all studio and art history courses and will only have to register for non-Fine Arts electives.

    Bachelor of Fine Arts students are not required to complete distribution credits or a major or minor program.

      Step 3: Register for courses

      Once course registration opens for new students:

      Go to course registration to:

      • find information about waitlists and special permissions
      • change or withdraw from courses
      • find FAQ about Connect
      What is Connect?

      Connect is Mount Allison's information service for students.

      Here you can access:

      • your personal profile (e.g. address, contact information)
      • academic profile (e.g. transcripts, grades)
      • financial information
      • personalized timetable
      • exam schedules

      Connect is also used to register for courses.

      For more details, visit course registration.


          Registration help resources

          Don't be afraid to reach out for help!

          For questions about contact
          Course selection and advising advisor@mta.ca or set up a virtual appointment
          Course registration issues reghelp@mta.ca | (506) 364-2269
          Individual courses contact the course instructor or department head
          Course delivery options regoffice@mta.ca | (506) 364-2269
          FAQ — course planning and registration basics

          When and how should I register for my courses?
          You are strongly advised to register for both fall and winter term courses as soon as possible to ensure availability of space. Course registration is on a first-come first-choice basis. Course registration does reach capacity so it is best to register early, well before arriving on campus in September (preferably by mid June).

          What courses can I take?
          As a student new to university, you must select fall term courses that do not have prerequisites. Refer to the list of courses without prerequisites for a complete listing of courses available to all students at the University. Some first year courses may require permission of the department or a placement test prior to registration. The course timetables list all courses offered at Mount Allison University in the current academic year. For course timetables, a list of courses without prerequisites and courses with placement tests, visit choose your courses and plan your schedule.

          How are courses scheduled and how many courses do I choose?
          Courses are offered during two terms in the academic year. The Fall term runs from September to December, and the Winter term runs from January to April. Every course has a credit hour value. Most courses are three-credit courses offered in one term. A normal course load is 30 credits over the fall and winter terms.

          If you intend to carry a normal course load you should register for 10 courses in total — five courses (15 credits) in the fall term, and five courses (15 credits) in the winter term.

          Every degree program requires completion of 120 credits in total:

          • 15 credits per term X 2 terms = 30 credits per year
          • 30 credits per year X 4 years = 120 credits

          Three courses per term is the minimum course load required to be considered a full-time student. The same tuition fees are charged for full-time studies whether you are enrolled in three, four or five courses per term.

          Registration in one or two courses per term is considered part-time enrolment, and part-time students pay a per course tuition fee.

          When determining the proper course load for you, it is recommended to review information on reduced course load, located on choose your courses and plan your schedule.

          Do I need to also register for labs and tutorials?
          In addition to the regular class (lecture), a number of courses also involve a mandatory lab or tutorial component. In the academic timetable and in Connect, compulsory labs are listed below the course and end with the letter L. Labs/tutorials may have more than one section listed (L 1, L 2, etc.). Students can choose whichever section fits best in their schedule. Labs do not count as separate courses in your registration. You must register separately for labs / tutorials at the same time that you register for the class. You will know if the course has a lab or tutorial because the system will not let you register for the course alone.

          How can I determine the level and credit value of a course?
          Please refer to Academic Calendar — Section 11.

          What if a course I want to take is full?
          First, check to see if there is another section of the course offered at a different time or in the other term. You may find seats available there. If you can't find a seat in another section you should add yourself to the waitlist for the course. Visit course registration for more information.

          Is there a registration deadline? Can I make changes to my registration after classes begin?
          Please refer to Academic Calendar — Section 10.4 for regulations regarding changes in registration and withdrawal. Specific add, drop and withdrawal deadlines are listed on academic dates and deadlines. Email advisor@mta.ca if you have any questions about registration or withdrawal.

          Where can I find specific regulations regarding the various academic degrees?
          For requirements for the various degrees as well the requirements for majors and minors, visit degree requirements. You can also visit our Academic Calendar — Academic Programs.

          How can I find the textbooks I need for my courses?
          You can search online on the bookstore website for textbooks listed for your courses. Visit books, course materials, and supplies.

          When are my exams?
          Students will be notified by email and an exam schedule will normally be posted under schedules and important dates by the end of the fourth week of classes in the term. For more information, visit exams.

          Can I take courses outside of my faculty?
          Yes. Students are encouraged to explore their interests in various disciplines. Students in the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Commerce programs are required to take distribution requirements as part of their degree.

          I want to change my degree program. What should I do?
          Find out more about changing degree programs.

          What if I need extra help in a course?  
          Start by talking to your professor — they want to help you learn. You can also get a peer tutor and seek additional assistance from academic resources such as the math help centre and writing resource centre. Visit academic supports for more information. Don't be shy about asking for help!

          What should I do if I don't want to continue with a course?  
          Be sure to familiarize yourself with academic dates and deadlines and review the regulations on course withdrawal.

          Guide to using Connect to register for courses

          When you're admitted to Mount Allison, you automatically receive a MtA username and password. 

          You'll then be able to log into web services like Connect, Moodle, Experience MtA, and DeviceNet.

          How to use Connect to register for courses:

          Using Connect — video tutorials

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

           

           Getting started with MtA web services

           

           

           

           

           

           

           


          What's next?

          Visit new students for a helpful list of things to help you get started on your Mount Allison experience. Our staff and students are here to support you every step of the way.